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Veterans Services Director Bob Mayer

Veteran services officials from colleges and universities throughout the country had the opportunity to learn about Mount Wachusett Community College’s Center of Excellence for Veteran Student Success during a recent national conference.MWCC Director of Veterans Services Bob Mayer was selected to present on “Student Veterans’ Centers: Designing to Implementation to Upgrading,” during the 2015 NASPA Veterans Conference Feb. 8 – 10 in Louisville, KY.

Mayer, a veteran of the U.S. Army and the Army National Guard, participated on the panel with administrators from the University of Arizona, the University of South Florida, Bowling Green State University, and Keiser University. His remarks focused on the growth of the college’s Veterans Success Center and its partnerships with Veterans Administration and local and state veteran support groups to augment services to students.

The 2015 NASPA Veterans Conference was designed to provide a forum for experienced professionals focusing on institutional policy, programming and other emerging issues in serving military students and veterans.

 

Nate Haney

MWCC alumnus Nate Haney, now a stage manager at ESPN, recently shared his career experiences with current students.

How do you get from Studio B in the basement of Mount Wachusett Community College to the advanced television studios at ESPN? MWCC alumnus Nate Haney shared how he did just that during presentations to Media Arts and Technology students on February 5 at the college’s Gardner campus.

Haney, a 2006 graduate of MWCC who now works full-time as a stage manager at the Bristol, CT-based sports station, shared how he navigated the journey from classroom to dream job and what it’s like to work for the “Worldwide Leader in Sports.”

Internships, networking, volunteering and making the most of every opportunity that comes along were among the key tips he shared.

“I cannot emphasize enough the importance of internships due to the competitiveness. Be bold and daring, but not pushy. Make the most of every opportunity to learn and to network. Even if it’s 8 a.m. on a Saturday, do it. It will be worth it in the end,” Haney said. “Make yourself valuable, indispensable and unexpendable and great things can happen.”

Haney received his degree from MWCC in 2006 and transferred to Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts in North Adams to earn his bachelor’s degree. He started in the industry as an intern at WCVB Boston-Channel 5, then went on to work for four years as a freelancer and part-time seasonal studio technician for New England Sports Network, covering the Boston Red Sox and the Boston Bruins.

After enduring a six-hour interview at ESPN, he was hired as a stage manager in February 2013, starting off on the station’s Sports Center. He is curently in training to become an associate director.

The MRT department, formerly known as Broadcasting and Electronic Media, developed a speaker series more than five years ago to introduce current students to industry professionals and hear first-hand about various aspects of the industry, said Associate Professor Joel Anderson. “We’re always excited to invite our alumni back to share their experiences in the field.”

pennant[1]Mount Wachusett Community College will host FAFSA Day Massachusetts on Sunday, Feb. 22 at 1 p.m. at the Gardner campus.

Every high school senior, college student, and adult student who will be attending college during the 2015-2016 academic year needs to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in order to apply for federal, state, and institutional financial aid. FAFSA Day Massachusetts, part of the national College Goal Sunday program, provides free help statewide to students and families looking to complete the FAFSA.

Families are encouraged to visit www.FAFSADay.org to view locations, dates, and times, to register, and to see a list of what to bring. The services are free and available to anyone attending college for the 2015-2016 academic year. Low-income, first-generation students are especially encouraged to attend.

FAFSA Day is staffed by volunteer financial aid and higher education experts available to provide families with one-on-one assistance. FAFSA Day is a non-profit program sponsored by Massachusetts Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, MEFA, American Student Assistance, and USA Funds.

To register or for more information visit www.FAFSADay.org.

Bath Spa University

The Massachusetts Department of Education has announced a new scholarship opportunity for community college students to study at Bath Spa University in England.

Massachusetts community college students interested in starting careers in business and entrepreneurship will have a unique opportunity to study abroad and earn their bachelor’s degree for free through a new scholarship program launched by Shorelight Education in partnership with Bath Spa University and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the Department of Higher Education has announced.

Shorelight, a Massachusetts-based company that partners with leading nonprofit universities to increase access for international students, has established the Shorelight Global Scholarship Program to give two Massachusetts students a full two-year scholarship worth an estimated $85,000, including tuition, housing and airfare. Students will attend the undergraduate School of Business and Entrepreneurship at Bath Spa University in Bath, England, and are expected to complete the coursework required to earn a bachelor’s degree. The program will begin in the fall 2015 semester.

“This is an extraordinary opportunity for highly motivated students to earn a four-year degree while also having an opportunity to study abroad,” said Massachusetts Higher Education Commissioner Richard Freeland. “I commend Shorelight Education and Bath Spa University for creating the scholarship program and for recognizing the talents and creative potential of our community college students.”

The primary goal of the scholarship program is to help aspiring community college students turn their business ideas into reality through the combination of a rigorous academic curriculum with real-world resources available in the Bath-Bristol region—a major innovation hub and the UK’s second largest community of tech startups. Students enrolled at Bath Spa University’s School of Business and Entrepreneurship will have the opportunity to explore their ideas while learning the fundamentals of business operations and management in an international setting. The program aims to help them launch and manage ventures that can succeed in today’s global economy.

“We look forward to helping two hard-working Massachusetts students access an amazing opportunity to get a global perspective and a world-class business education,” said Shorelight CEO Tom Dretler.

The scholarship is tailored for students who are interested in starting new businesses, offering a new product or service, creating an innovation or commercializing an invention. Students interested in applying for the scholarship must submit an application by April 1. Full details on eligibility and how to apply can be found at the Department of Higher Education’s web site, http://www.mass.edu/osfa/programs/shorelight.asp.

Henry_David_Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau

MWCC’s Humanities Project, East Meets West in a Cabin in Concord: Walden and Beyond, continues during the spring semester with several community book discussions and a poetry reading. The events, inspired by Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, are free and open to the public.

A discussion on Cal Armistead’s “Being Henry David,” will take place Wednesday, Feb. 11 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Gardner campus. In Armistead’s debut novel about a teen in search of himself, 17-year-old “Hank” lands at Penn Station in New York City with no memory of anything – who he is, where he came from or why he’s running away. His only possession is a worn copy of Walden by Henry David Thoreau. And so he becomes Henry David – or “Hank” – and takes first to the streets, and then to the only destination he can think of – Walden Pond in Concord, Mass. As Hank begins to piece together recollections from his past, he realizes that the only way he can discover his present is to face up to the realities of his grievous memories.

A book discussion on Jane Langton’s mystery, “The Transcendental Murder,” will take place Thursday, March 5 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Leominster Public Library. In this first Homer Kelly mystery, Langton takes readers to Concord, where a manuscript that may or may not have been written by Thoreau is at the center of a mysterious murder.

“American Primitive,” Mary Oliver’s Pulitzer Prize-winning collection of poetry, will be the topic of a book discussion Thursday, March 26 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Fitchburg Public Library. This collection of 50 poems offers readers a lesson in stillness and observation. Called “an indefatigable guide to the natural world,” Oliver’s book keeps alive the tradition that Thoreau began a century and a half earlier.

A poetry reading with Gail Thomas, author of “No Simple Wilderness: An Elegy for Swift River Valley,” will take place Wednesday, April 15 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Athol Public Library. Thomas’s collection of poems recreates with grace and dignity the voices of the men and women of the Swift River Valley who were displaced when the Quabbin Reservoir was created. What would Thoreau have said about this reclaiming of the natural world at the expense of community and individual autonomy?

Funded by a Challenge Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the MWCC Humanities Project is an ongoing initiative designed to strengthen the college’s humanities curriculum, support collaborative and interdisciplinary teaching and research in the humanities, examine the intersection between the humanities and other academic disciplines, and engage MWCC and the community in the discussion of enduring themes from the world’s many cultures and traditions. For more information, visit http://mwcc.edu/humanitiesproject.

2015-01-23 13.11.20

Dean Janice Barney and Auto Tech Department Chair Professor Peter Kaufmann

Mount Wachusett Community College’s Automotive Technology programs have received continued accreditation from the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation in the areas of instruction, course of study, facilities and equipment, and has met the standards of quality for the training of automobile technicians.

MWCC offers an automotive technology academic certificate and an associate degree to prepare graduates for positions in transportation-related industries. Professor Peter Kaufmann was the program’s first instructor when it launched in 1979 and is now the program chair.

“We are so grateful to Peter for his many years of dedicated service, which have benefited all of our students in the Auto Technology program,” said Janice Barney, Dean of the School of Business, Science and Technology and Mathematics.

 

MWCC Dental Programs 10 year celebration group photo

President Asquino, former Trustee Ellen Daly, outgoing Dental Education Programs Director Anne Malkasian and new chair Cynthia Cadoret are joined by students and alumni at the anniversary celebration.

Mount Wachusett Community College administrators, faculty, students and alumni joined representatives from North Central Massachusetts dental and medical community to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the college’s dental education programs. The event, held Jan. 22 at the programs’ new academic site, the Fitchburg Family Community Health Center, featured a reception, tours of the new facility, student presentations and refreshments.

President Daniel M. Asquino praised the college’s dental education programs as a model among the state’s community colleges for their clinical partnership with the Community Health Center to serve area residents who otherwise would not have access to dental care.

“There is no program like this, where students get the kind of exposure and experience they get at Mount Wachusett,” he said.

The college launched its dental hygiene program in 2005 following an outpouring of generosity from the dental community who saw a healthcare need and partnered with the college to address it, Asquino said. The part-time dental assisting program began in 2012. “It’s a model partnership where dentists and the dental community got some grants and we started the program for the community.”

To date, the programs have celebrated the academic success of 113 graduates. Alumni representing each graduating class from 2007 to 2014 attended the event, along with current students.

The event also recognized the decade-long leadership of Program Director Anne Malkasian, who is retiring.

“This evening we are celebrating a milestone for the dental education programs at Mount Wachusett Community College,” she said.

Malkasian thanked the numerous supporters who helped launch the program and ensure its continued success, including Ellen Daly, former chair of MWCC’s Board of Trustees. A retired dental hygienist, Daly was instrumental in starting the program. Daly, who attended the celebration, said she is delighted with the growth and continued success of the dental education programs.

“I may have planted a seed, but the work has been done by the college staff,” Daly said.

Professor Cynthia Cadoret, the new chair of the dental education programs department, announced the creation of the Dental Health Alumni Scholarship to benefit future students. Alumni, current students, college faculty and administrators, industry vendors and other supporters have contributed to the new scholarship. 

 

CJ

Charles “CJ” Husselbee, a first-generation college student, simultaneously earned his high school diploma and an academic certificate in accounting through MWCC’s Robinson-Broadhurst Foundation Career Tech Scholarship. He went on to earn an associate degree in Business Administration in 2014 a year ahead of schedule, and is now pursuing a bachelor’s in accounting at the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Mount Wachusett Community College’s dual enrollment programs are showcased as innovative models in the Rennie Center for Education Research & Policy’s second annual report, the Condition of Education in the Commonwealth. The report, released January 22 by the Cambridge-based research institute, examines areas of success and areas for continued improvement in student outcomes across the education pipeline, from birth to college and career success.

The report notes MWCC’s record of success and its potential to serve as a model for other communities across  Massachusetts, citing as examples the Gateway to College program for students at risk of dropping out, the Pathways Early College Innovation School, and the Robinson-Broadhurst Foundation Career Tech Scholarship.

The second annual report includes a set of 25 data indicators representing critical student outcomes and, for the first time this year, an action guide that focuses on three areas where data indicate the need for further reform: setting a strong foundation in early childhood, attending to the whole child with comprehensive supports, and preparing college-ready students through innovative high school designs.

The action guide focuses on existing programs that could, if brought to scale, lead to substantial progress in educational outcomes for students. Mount Wachusett Community College was showcased as a model for policymakers and practitioners.

“The Condition of Education project offers a platform for constructive dialogue among stakeholders about the most effective strategies to promote student success,” said the center’s Executive Director Chad d’Entremont. “Through this report, the Rennie Center brings together thought leaders to develop a shared understanding, grounded in evidence, of the state of our educational system. We are excited to shine a light on the great work that Mount Wachusett is doing to contribute to positive outcomes for Massachusetts students.”

“Dual enrollment programs expand academic opportunities and open doors to higher education for teenagers,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “Our programs cover a wide spectrum – including programs that restore excitement in learning for students who feel disengaged from the traditional high school experience, to those that help students accelerate the pace of their studies to get an early start on their career goals. We are delighted to partner with the Rennie Center to share our best practices with communities across the commonwealth.”

The report was released during a forum on Jan. 22 in Boston. Speakers included Massachusetts Secretary of Education James Peyser, Dr. Andrew Hargreaves of the Lynch School of Education at Boston College and author of The Fourth Way: the Inspiring Future for Educational Change.

Building upon its successful Gateway to College program, MWCC partnered with the Mahar Regional School District to launch the Pathways Early College Innovation High School in. Students with a GPA of 3.0 enroll during their junior year and earn a high school diploma and an associate degree simultaneously. The program focuses on high-achieving students, and recruits a largely low-income, first-generation population that might not attend college without this opportunity. The Pathways school draws on a variety of public and private funds, including district school-choice funds, to remain sustainable.

In partnership with Winchendon Public Schools, high school students can opt into a one-year, full-time dual enrollment program that features career-oriented options, such as health care, information technology, accounting or computer science. Funded by the Robinson-Broadhurst Foundation, this program lets students earn their high school diploma and an academic certificate simultaneously, which can be applied toward an associate degree. The Rennie Center report notes that these are popular choices for students who are eager to complete a two-year degree or a work-based certification and enter the workforce quickly. Students are provided with private foundation scholarships from the Robinson-Broadhurst Foundation to cover the costs associated with coursework.

MWCC has also expanded on its college transition offerings in other ways as well, the report notes. As a solution to remediation, the college administers the Accuplacer math and English placement tests to all juniors in nine partner high schools. In addition, MWCC faculty collaborate with high school faculty to develop rigorous and targeted 12th grade math courses to prepare all students to enter directly into credit-bearing coursework upon graduation. Fitchburg High School, Leominster High School, Leominster High’s Center for Technical Education Innovation and Montachusett Regional Vocational Technical High School participate in this Math Modeling initiative, with a planned expansion to an additional two to three high schools in the 2015-16 school year.

The Rennie Center was launched in 2002 by then-Secretary of Education Paul Reville as a division of the Massachusetts Institute for a New Commonwealth (MassINC). In 2005, the Rennie Center became an independent non-profit organization committed to addressing the critical challenges of reforming education in Massachusetts. For more information and to view the report, visit www.renniecenter.org.

 

FHS alumni event with MWCC 2015

Fitchburg High alumni with Principal Jeremy Roche, left, and MWCC Assistant GEAR UP Director Victor Rojas, right.

Recent graduates of Fitchburg, Athol, Ralph C. Mahar and Murdock high schools returned to their alma maters this month to offer tips to current high students on a wide range of topics, including the application process, coursework and study requirements, financial aid and dorm life.

The events were sponsored by MWCC’s Division of Access and Transition in partnership with the high school guidance departments. Many of the returning alumni are past participants of MWCC’s Educational Talent Search, GEAR UP, North Central Mass Educational Talent Search, Upward Bound Math and Science, and Robinson-Broadhurst Career Tech programs. The alumni are now pursuing a variety of academic programs at public and private colleges and universities.

Murdock alumni 2015

MurdockPrincipal Josh Romano, left, MWCC Access & Transition Aide Davis Brush, second from right, and Angele Goss, right, Director, North Central Mass Educational Talent Search/UBMS, with Murdock alumni.

The annual alumni breakfast event “is a great way for our graduates to give back to their school,” said Murdock Principal Josh Romano. “Many of our students are first generation college students, so Mount Wachusett’s Access and Transition programs help them greatly with the process of preparing for college success. The programs give us another way of guiding our students and showing them the options that are available.”

“I think it’s important for kids who are thinking about going to college to hear from people who have gone before them how important and how impactful college is on their lives,” said Mahar alum Jessica Gilmore, who now attends Brandeis University. “When their questions can be answered, it isn’t so scary of a process anymore because real people have done it before them.”

Mahar

Mahar alumni

High school students said they enjoy the annual event. “I learned that once you get to college it is no more playing games,” said Fitchburg senior Shakira Collazo. “It is real life and you have to be ready to work. It is either go hard or go home.”

Participating alumni include:

Fitchburg: Erica Sandrelli and Luis Jusino (Mount Wachusett Community College);Rubin Seyde (Boston University); Nina Thirakoune (Bentley University); Rachael Lanni, (Worcester Polytechnic Institute); Matti Phaneuf (University of Massachusetts, Amherst).

Athol High School alumni event

MWCC Access & Transition counselor Steven ringer, front row, left, Athol Principal Dr. Steven Meyer, and alumni.

Athol: James Hughes (MWCC and University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Alex Page (Bentley University); Kyle White, (Bentley University); Marissa Roberts (Green Mountain College); Rachel Karen (Westfield State University); Gloria Walters (UMass Amherst); Jennifer Holden (Framingham State University); Devin Belden (Bridgewater State University); Elizabeth Arpide (Emerson College).

Mahar: Troix Adams (University of Tampa); Kurtis Graeff and Derek Porter (Worcester PoIytechnic Institute); Jessica Gilmore (Brandeis University); and Dylan Robichaud (Lyndon State College).

Murdock: Charles C.J. Husselbee, (MWCC and UMass, Amherst); Tyler Perry, (UMass Amherst); Brittany Eliason, (Saint Anselm College); Katrina Williams, (Worcester State) James Maynard (Westfield State); Justin Smith, (Salem State); Robert Holly, University of New Mexico; Justin Harris (Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Alex Emerson (Syracuse University).

Bionostics Floyd 2Mount Wachusett Community College is recruiting adults of all ages, experience and education for training in the growing field of advanced manufacturing. Full scholarships are available for eligible students who enroll in an upcoming six-week day program, which begins on Feb. 9 at MWCC’s Devens campus.

Manufacturing accounts for nearly 25 percent of the workforce in North Central Massachusetts, employing more than 14,000 people in the region. The demand for skilled workers continues to grow as a result of new opportunities and the retirement of older workers.

The training program is designed especially for unemployed or underemployed adults, veterans and recent high school graduates who want to train for careers the manufacturing industry. Programs provide students with training in skills required for entry-level employment as technicians in manufacturing, validation, quality control, documentation, process operations and more.

Students who successfully complete the program will earn an MWCC Certificate of Completion, an OSHA 10-hour Safety Certification and the National Career Readiness Certificate, while learning about working in the fast-growing manufacturing field.

The six-week, 180-hour Advanced Manufacturing Career Preparation program will take place Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. This program is open to students who do not already have a college degree. The course includes hands-on, lecture-based material as well as self-paced KeyTrain curriculum leading to the National Career Readiness Certification.

Students must possess a minimum of a high school diploma or equivalent. Students will have access to staff members who will assist them with the registration process, facilitate access to support services, and help them with their search for employment when they have completed the certificate program successfully. Tutoring and job search support is also available.

The training program is made possible through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration. Tuition support is provided by a Workforce Competitiveness Trust Fund grant awarded through the North Central Massachusetts Workforce Investment Board by Commonwealth Corporation on behalf of the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development.

For more information about enrolling in the training program, contact the Devens campus at 978-630-9569 or email Career Development Coach Christian Reifsteck at creifsteck@mwcc.mass.edu.