Campus Life

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DClogoThe American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) is spearheading a national effort to engage students in the topic of economic inequality and its impact on democracy through a three-year initiative. Leading the 31 participating institutions in this effort are Mount Wachusett Community College and Keene State College. All participants are members of AASCU’s American Democracy Project (ADP) or The Democracy Commitment (TDC).

Participating institutions will invite students and community members to confront the complex causes of economic inequality through the development of curriculum that will be applied to many areas of study and hands-on learning opportunities. Specifically, students will study the relationship between public policy, economic inequality, economic opportunity, and social mobility. These strategies, including the introduction of a course in economic inequality for students at two- and four-year schools, will be designed for further adoption by campuses across the country.

“AASCU is excited to assemble this group of two- and four-year institutions that together will examine and address the growing economic inequality in this county, a trend that poses a serious threat to our democracy,” remarked George Mehaffy, AASCU’s vice president of academic leadership and change.

MWCC’s Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement and The American Democracy Project at Keene State College will spearhead national efforts, which also promote community outreach, civic pathways for student success, and prepare undergraduates for lives of informed civic engagement. Most activities will take place on participating campuses, with the two lead institutions providing support and networking by hosting national conference calls and webinars.

“We are proud to partner with AASCU, Keene State College, and colleges and universities across the country on this timely initiative,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “More than ever before, our students are graduating into a global society that is stratified across lines of economic class and political ideologies as much as they always have been across issues of gender, culture and religion. As educators, it is our responsibility to ensure that our students have the opportunity to think critically and creatively about these issues—and discover their own abilities to initiate change in areas of public policy, economic opportunity and inequality, and social mobility,” he said.

MWCC faculty participating in the initiative include Julie Capozzi, Elmer Eubanks, Shane Martin, Yvonne Noyes-Stevens, Maureen Provost, Tom Montagno, Kate Smith, Dan Soucy and Michelle Valois. They will join Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement staff members Fagan Forhan and Shelley Errington Nicholson.

“I am thrilled that Keene State College and MWCC are partnering with AASCU to involve students in discussions and experiences that demonstrate the ways that economic inequality affects our society—this issue is urgent and relevant to every state in our nation. The approach we are taking on this topic leverages critical thinking, community engagement, and academic preparation, which will make a real impact on our students now and in the years to come after graduation,” said Keene State College President, Dr. Anne Huot.

National Network of Participating Schools

In addition to Keene State College, four-year institutions include Buffalo State (SUNY); California State University, Chico; California State University, Monterey Bay; Cleveland State University; Dalton State College (Ga.); Ferris State University (Mich.); Indiana University Northwest; Missouri State University; Northeastern Illinois University; Northern Kentucky University; Richard Stockton College of New Jersey; Salisbury University (Md.); Slippery Rock University (Penn.); St. Cloud State University (Minn.); SUNY Cortland; Texas A&M University-Central Texas; University of Houston Downtown; Weber State University (Utah); Western Carolina University (N.C.); and Wright State University (Ohio).

In addition to MWCC, participating two-year institutions include Allegany College of Maryland; De Anza College (Calif.); Kirkwood Community College (Iowa); Lone Star College, Kingwood (Texas); Manchester Community College (Conn.); Monroe Community College (N.Y.); Moraine Valley Community College (Ill.); Santa Fe College (Fla.); and Tarrant County College, Southeast Campus (Texas).

ADP and TDC, representing four- and two-year schools, respectively, create a variety of civic-engagement and academic-enrichment initiatives that encourage graduates to become informed, engaged participants in our democracy. TDC is modeled after ADP, and both organizations are sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities.

 

Mount Wachusett Community College students and faculty welcomed Thoreau Society Executive Director Michael Frederick for a Humanities Project lecture on Thoreau’s influence on contemporary nonviolent reformers. Civ_Dis_Medal_175

While Thoreau’s essay, “Civil Disobedience,” and guiding philosophies served as inspiration for Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr., Frederick noted fundamental differences between Thoreau and his more passive disciples.

Published posthumously, “Civil Disobedience” was originally titled “Resistance to Civil Government,” and Frederick said the original was more consistent with Thoreau’s viewpoints.

Thoreau was also “consistent on the use of force” in opposing government and supported abolitionist John Brown, who sought to arm slaves and bring about their violent rebellion, said Frederick.

Finally, Frederick said, “Our concept of civil disobedience [and that of Gandhi and King, Jr.] is one of collective action. Thoreau’s was one of individual action.”

The final Humanities Project event of 2014 will take place Dec. 4 and feature student presentations and exhibits. For more information about the MWCC Humanities Project and a full schedule of events taking place this spring, visit http://mwcc.edu/humanitiesproject.

Mount Wachusett Community College, long recognized nationally for its comprehensive veteran services, has again been named to Military Times’ Best for Vets: Colleges 2015 rankings.

MWCC was ranked seventh nationally among two-year colleges in the Military Times' Best for Vets: Colleges 2015 rankings.

MWCC was ranked seventh nationally among two-year colleges in the Military Times’ Best for Vets: Colleges 2015 rankings.

Released alongside Veterans Day, the independent news project evaluates organizations based on their support systems and campus cultures to provide a reference point for service members, military veterans and their families. In order be considered for the rankings, MWCC and other colleges meticulously documented these services through a survey with over 100 questions.

MWCC was ranked seventh nationally among two-year schools in a list that includes a total of 140 four-year, two-year, online and nontraditional schools. The list will be published in issues of Army Times, Navy Times, Air Force Times, Marine Corps Times and Military Times EDGE magazine, as well as online at MilitaryTimes.com, ArmyTimes.com, NavyTimes.com, AirForceTimes.com and MarineCorpsTimes.com.

“Given this award’s proximity to Veterans Day, we express our collective gratitude to veterans throughout this country, including those we are fortunate to call MWCC students,” said President Daniel M. Asquino. “These students strengthen our campus community, and we are proud to provide the services that help them flourish.”

“This is a school whose faculty and staff are genuinely good people who sincerely care about our veteran population,” said Veterans Services Director Robert Mayer. “I can’t express how good it makes me feel to know that, wherever they go on campus, our veterans will be taken care of.”

MWCC launched the Center of Excellence for Veteran Student Success in 2010 to address the unique academic, financial, social and physical needs of veterans, military personnel and military families transitioning to college life. Student veterans are also active members of the campus community, participating in such clubs and organizations as the Veterans Group and Student Government Association.

In August 2013, MWCC became one of the first 250 higher-education institutions to implement President Obama’s “8 Keys to Success” initiative to help boost academic opportunities and improvement employment outcomes for veterans.

MWCC also maintains community partnerships with the Montachusett Veteran Outreach Center, the Northeast Veteran Training & Rehabilitation Center operated by Veteran Homestead, Inc., the Massachusetts Department of Veterans Services’ SAVE program, and local posts of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion.

The residential and educational partnership between MWCC and the NVTRC, run on a portion of campus property, served as the focus of a recent segment on WGBY in Springfield.

Chris Jason Sinatra Live Big Band

An Oct. 24 performance by Frank Sinatra stylist Chris Jason and the Sinatra Live Big Band raised more than $38,000 to support scholarship funds for MWCC students.

Frank Sinatra stylist Chris Jason and the Sinatra Live Big Band transported a capacity crowd to Las Vegas, 1966, during an Oct. 24 concert sponsored by the Mount Wachusett Community College Foundation that raised more than $38,000 for student scholarships.

Making his first appearance at MWCC’s theatre, Jason performed over 20 Sinatra favorites and exchanged quips with audience members in the two-act benefit concert that served as the foundation’s annual fundraiser.

“Students need our financial support now more than ever,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “It was heartening to see so many friends of the college enjoying an evening out with great music, while raising much needed money for student scholarships.”

“On behalf of the entire board, I want to thank those who came out in support of our hard-working students. I applaud all the MWCC staff who worked to bring Chris Jason to the stage for Sinatra at the Mount,” said MWCC Board of Trustees Chair Tina Sbrega.

Established in 1971, the MWCC Foundation currently offers 38 scholarships, 21 for continuing students and 17 for transfer students, to support degree seekers from a range of backgrounds and academic disciplines. Sinatra at the Mount was part of an annual slate of fundraising events that help provide increased access to a college education at MWCC.

“Thanks to a dedicated team at the college, we raised more than $30,000 for our students,” said MWCC Foundation Executive Director Carla Zottoli, “Support from donors and friends helps us award more than $260,000 in scholarships each year.”

“What a great evening,” said Foundation Board Chair Richard Mohnk. “I want to thank Executive Director Carla Zottoli and her team for hosting a flawless event. The music was wonderful, and the evening was for a very good cause – our students.”

After opening with “Come Fly with Me,” Jason crooned through renditions of “Luck Be a Lady,” “Where or When,” “Fly Me to the Moon,” My Way,” “I’ve Got You under My Skin” and “Strangers in the Night.” Shortly into the second act, one couple danced to Jason’s version of “A Summer Wind.”

To cap off the night, the Sinatra tribute artist returned to a standing ovation for one final performance of “New York, New York.”

In paying tribute to Sinatra, Jason adapted songs from the 1966 live album, “Sinatra at the Sands,” and “The Great American Songbook” and infused the artist’s trademark humor into his performance.

- Cameron Woodcock

Mount Wachusett Community College art student Amber Martinez created this Thoreau-inspired environmental sculpture as part of the college’s ongoing humanities project.

Mount Wachusett Community College art student Amber Martinez created this Thoreau-inspired environmental sculpture as part of the college’s ongoing humanities project.

While Mount Wachusett Community College professors find innovative ways for their students to examine Thoreau, the author’s lasting influence has also extended into the community.

On Wednesday night, the college held the second event in its ongoing series, “East Meets West in a Cabin in the Woods: Walden and Beyond,” the first year-theme of the MWCC Humanities Project. Approximately 45 people gathered at Levi Heywood Memorial Library for UMass Lowell Associate Professor Susan Gallagher’s presentation on the historic connection between Thoreau and climate-change research.

Thoreau observed the first flowering dates for over 500 species of wildflowers in Concord between 1851 and 1858, and his observations on nature allow scientists to monitor climate change over the last 150 years, she said.

Inspired by Thoreau and his deep appreciation for nature, students in Art Professor Tom Matsuda’s Sculpture 1 course are manipulating sticks, leaves and other natural materials to create temporary environmental sculptures throughout campus. Student sculptures are also reminiscent of those created by Andy Goldsworthy, the renowned British artist who works almost exclusively with natural materials.

“I like sculptures made from nature, and the college’s emphasis on Thoreau inspired me to develop this project,” said Matsuda. “For students, it opens up a different way of thinking about art and an appreciation for what’s around us and encourages creative problem solving. The response from faculty, staff, students and the community has been great.”

Amber Martinez, an art major from Winchendon, arranged leaves into a spiral shape on a rock. The way Thoreau and Goldsworthy connected with nature motivated her to forage for natural materials to create a sculpture, she said. “It was a wonderful experience to get out of the convention of traditional art.”

Fitchburg resident and art major Garrett Watson created the only indoor sculpture, a composition of twigs that is displayed in a skylight of the college’s art wing. “Working with raw materials, such as saplings, is different than many of the other things we’ve done,” he said. Just as Thoreau famously adopted a modest lifestyle while living at Walden Pond, Watson followed “a simple idea and design” to create his sculpture.

The MWCC Humanities Project will continue with five additional October events, beginning next week at the Gardner campus. A film screening of “Into the Wild” will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 7 from 12:30 to 2:45 p.m. in room 127. A lecture titled “Thoreau’s Relevance for Our Time” will run from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the North Cafeteria.

Further events include a fundraising hike at Wachusett Mountain on Saturday, Oct. 18; a book discussion of “Cabin Fever: A Suburban Father’s Search for the Wild” on Tuesday, Oct. 28; and a performance by Thoreau re-enactor Richard Smith on Thursday, Oct. 30.

The MWCC Humanities Project was established through a 2013 challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. “East Meets West in a Cabin in Concord: Walden and Beyond” will feature a full slate of free events spotlighting various works written or inspired by Thoreau, as well as a campus-wide, interdisciplinary initiative.

For more information and a full list of events, visit http://mwcc.edu/humanitiesproject.

Director of Veterans Services Bob Mayer with student veterans during this fall's orientation.

Director of Veterans Services Bob Mayer with student veterans during this fall’s orientation.

For the sixth consecutive year, Mount Wachusett Community College has been recognized as a top military-friendly school for creating a culture of positive energy and academic support for veterans, active military members and their dependents.

The 2015 Military Friendly Schools list, released by Victory Media, names the top 15 percent of American colleges, universities and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace military students and ensure their success in the classroom and after graduation. Now in its sixth year, the list serves as the primary resource for service members and military families seeking education and captures best practices among schools in supporting military students.

The list features 1,600 institutions and was compiled through research and a data-driven survey of more than 8,000 schools approved for Post-9/11 GI Bill funding. Qualifying campuses will be featured in the G.I. Jobs Guide to Military Friendly Schools, among other Victory Media publications.

“It is our responsibility to foster an environment in which student veterans can thrive, both in the classroom and on campus,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “This award is a testament to our student veterans who courageously serve our country and then make the decision to transition to college life. We also have a wonderful staff in the Center of Excellence for Veteran Affairs and a supportive group of faculty and students.”

“This title we’ve received is not in name only; we’ve earned that status,” said Veterans Services Director Robert Mayer.

A designated Yellow Ribbon School with a long history of supporting veterans, MWCC was cited for the wrap-around support provided through the Center of Excellence for Veteran Student Success and the Veterans Group student club, an affiliate of the Student Veterans of America.

Established in 2010 the veterans success center now serves more than 350 students each year, addressing the unique academic, financial, social and physical needs of veterans, military personnel and military families transitioning to college life.

“The college has an excellent support team for veterans, and Bob is very involved in helping us succeed,” said Tom Berger, a business administration major who served in the U.S. Army from 1990 to 1998. “I enjoy being part of this peer group of students and getting involved in the college and local community.”

In August 2013, MWCC became one of the first 250 higher-education institutions to implement President Obama’s “8 Keys to Success” initiative to help boost academic opportunities and improvement employment outcomes for veterans. The eight keys build on the administration’s work to provide veterans and military families with a high-quality, affordable education and highlight specific ways that colleges and universities can support veterans as they pursue their education and employment goals.

In MWCC’s sixth year of recognition as a military-friendly school and service through the Veterans’ Success Center, and second year of implementing the “8 Keys,” its staff is still poised to increase the breadth of services to veterans.

- Cameron Woodcock

Purity Apiri was one of 200 volunteers who packaged meals for those in need during MWCC’s United Way Day of Caring project on Sept. 18.

Purity Apiri was one of 200 volunteers who packaged meals for those in need during MWCC’s United Way Day of Caring project on Sept. 18.

Capitalizing on its students’ eagerness to participate in community-engagement activities and a successful first year, Mount Wachusett Community College hosted its second annual United Way Day of Caring at its Gardner campus on Thursday, Sept. 18.

Through the leadership of the Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement, more than 200 volunteers packaged 20,736 meals for food pantries and veterans centers in North Central Massachusetts. An additional 200 meals are being made available to MWCC students struggling with food security through the college’s Students Serving Our Students (SOS) program.

“Civic engagement has been the cornerstone of our college for the last two decades, and it is the cornerstone of our democracy,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino, whose educational philosophy and college curriculum have long stressed civic engagement. “As Americans, we have an obligation to give back, and we are thrilled that our students and faculty can confront the major issue of hunger by helping  individuals in North Central Massachusetts.”

MWCC became a Day of Caring host site for the first time in 2013, following years of participation in the program and appeals from students wishing to donate their time. This year, the center organized 75-minute volunteer shifts from 8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. to accommodate students’ class schedules and maximize the number of meals distributed throughout the community.

“This is a very important undertaking because we are supporting food pantries throughout North Central Massachusetts, most of which have low stocks,” said Fagan Forhan, Director of the Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement. “Volunteer turnout this year has surpassed our expectations, so we made the decision to up the ante from 16,000 meals to 20,000 meals.”

Outreach, Inc., an Iowa-based nonprofit that also operates in the Northeast, provided supplies to create packages of meals consisting of macaroni and cheese and rice and beans.

Forhan credited the increased turnout to MWCC student and AmeriCorps VISTA John Day, who spearheaded the recruitment process. Among the many volunteers, MWCC student Jasson Alvarado Gomez arrived at 7 a.m. and unloaded an entire truck by himself.

“I get to school at 7 a.m. every day, so I was happy that I could help set up before the event started,” said Gomez, who, in his first year of volunteering, worked three shifts. “Helping people gives me so much energy, and I love doing it.”

MWCC participated along with numerous other organizations in North Central Massachusetts, recognizing the 19th Annual United Way Day of Caring.

Gardner resident Phillip Stan, center, was recently sworn in as student trustee on Mount Wachusett Community College’s Board of Trustees. President Daniel Asquino and board Chair Tina Sbrega were among the college officials who congratulated Stan during a ceremony at the college on Sept. 11.

Gardner resident Phillip Stan, center, was recently sworn in as student trustee on Mount Wachusett Community College’s Board of Trustees. President Daniel Asquino and board Chair Tina Sbrega were among the college officials who congratulated Stan during a ceremony at the college on Sept. 11.

Phillip Stan, a liberal arts major with a concentration in music, has been appointed to Mount Wachusett Community College’s Board of Trustees after being elected to the one-year position by his student peers this past spring.

The chamber music enthusiast and father of five was sworn in as the college’s student trustee on the afternoon of Sept. 11 and attended his first board meeting immediately following the ceremony.

Adding to his standing as a student leader on campus, Stan will represent fellow MWCC students on the 11-member board, a role he relishes.

“I want to serve as student trustee for the same reason I want to be involved with campus clubs and organizations. I enjoy being part of something bigger than myself and feel that the students need a strong voice to accurately represent their desires,” he said.

“We are very pleased that Phil will be serving as our student trustee this academic year, as his track record of academic achievement and student engagement is well-documented,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “Phil takes an active role not only in his own success, but in that of others.”

At MWCC, Stan serves in a range of leadership roles. He is vice president of civic and community engagement for the Phi Theta Kappa Honors Society, a member of both the Commonwealth Honors Program and the organization’s planning committee and a mentor in the Students Serving Our Students (SOS) program within the Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement. He also previously mentored children in the House of Peace and Education’s afterschool program in Gardner.

In addition, he is president of the MWCC Chamber Players club, an all-encompassing position that sees him arranging events, namely a 2013 trip to the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and building a chamber ensemble to stage concerts every semester. MWCC’s new student trustee is also an accomplished pianist, guitar player and singer.

However, Stan’s career goals are not purely musical.

“Ultimately, I’d love to work with autistic children through music instruction and exposure,” said Stan, who plans to pursue a bachelor’s degree in Music Therapy from Anna Maria College, his mother’s alma mater, after graduating from MWCC next spring. “I have a child at home with special needs, and I believe that music is a great way to facilitate communication with those who can’t communicate conventionally.”

With a busy college schedule and five children at home, Stan says he owes a great deal of credit to his wife Jennifer, whose enduring support has allowed him to succeed at MWCC.

As student trustee, Stan plans to apply his varied experience in civic engagement and mentorship to help students succeed in college, as well as benefit MWCC.

“I am very outgoing and not afraid to try new things or get people involved in new things,” said Stan, who, on the day of his appointment, fittingly helped freshman students gain signatures for Student Government Association candidacy. “I strongly believe in the importance of civic engagement and college completion, and these two things are a big part of what I would like to bring to MWCC.”

- Cameron Woodcock
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MWCC art major Amber Martinez participates in a Raku firing at Snow Farm Craft Center in Williamsburg, Mass. With funding provided by the MWCC Foundation, the art department will create an area on the Gardner campus for Raku and pit-firing ceramics.

With the start of the new academic year, the Mount Wachusett Community College Foundation has provided funds totaling $46,044 for eight innovative projects conceived by college faculty and staff.

“Current community college funding is such that we are often left wishing we had more resources to experiment with new and innovative pilot programs that have the potential to dramatically alter or create new opportunities for our students and the community,” said MWCC Foundation Executive Director Carla DeFosse. “The Innovation Fund allows us to financially support inventive staff and faculty and give them the opportunity to implement their concepts.”

Dean of Students Jason Zelesky will collaborate with the offices of Disability Services, Student Services and the Visions program to acquire new adaptive technology equipment to support students with documented disabilities. Enhancing the college’s inventory of assistive technologies will enhance academic success and encourage more students with disabilities to attend MWCC. The project will emphasize iOS applications and provide five iPads for student use in the classroom and during tutoring sessions.

Art Professor Joyce Miller received funding to create a program and fundraiser centered on Raku, a pottery tradition dating back to 16thcentury Japan. Available to art majors and non-art majors, as well as credit and noncredit students, the equipment will enhance the college’s art department to further attract prospective students. An exterior area will be designated for Raku and pit-firing ceramics. In addition to supporting the college’s art program, the equipment will support area high school art programs and their students by offering field trip opportunities and chances to participate in pit-firing or Raku firing, which in turn will assist with college recruitment.

Veronica Guay, Assistant Dean of Business, Science, Technology and Mathematics, and Perkins Counselor Shaunti Phillips, Career Vocational/Technical Education, will receive funding to create a new dual enrollment program for Gardner High School seniors interested in graphic and interactive design. Guay and Phillips will partner with Professor Leslie Cullen, chair of the Graphic & Interactive Design department; Natasha Robinson, Recruitment Counselor for the Admissions office; and members of the Gardner High School system.

Interim Director of Admissions Ai Co Abercrombie was awarded a grant to develop a peer-to-peer recruitment program, specifically targeting first-time students from traditionally underrepresented population groups: low-income and minority students and students with disabilities. The Admissions office plans to employ two student recruiters, one of traditional college age and one of non-traditional college age, who will accompany admissions representatives to college fairs, events and community activities and perform additional recruitment tasks.

Director of Student Success Debra Boucher received funding for a new program supporting non-traditional students as they transition to college life. The first portion of this program, a summer bridge session for non-traditional students and students returning to school following a five-year absence, took place in August. Incoming students learned about available resources at the college, while also participating in team-building activities. The program will continue this fall, as students attend two meetings to evaluate their college experiences and participate in leadership-building activities. Boucher is partnering with Student Services, the Visions program, the Advising Center and the Admissions office.

Lauren Mountain, Associate Director of the United Way Youth Venture in the college’s Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement, received funding to further develop immersive learning opportunities for MWCC students. Along with her colleagues in the Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement, Mountain will use funding to support student ventures that create tangible changes in the community and at the college, similar to the Youth Venture program that has long served middle and high school students. This initiative is designed to promote retention and involvement at MWCC, enhance the educational experience for students, and provide them with community contacts and job skills.

Professor Sheila Murphy will partner with the Admissions office to further promote the benefits of the Honors Program and increase awareness among incoming students. By continuing to shape and market this honors culture, Murphy hopes to attract prospective students to MWCC and motivate them to participate in the many challenging degree programs. Further program goals include emerging as a top destination for students who excel in high school. To increase first-year student enrollment and eligibility for the Honors Program, Murphy will also partner with the Marketing and Communications department and the Dual Enrollment program.

Associate Professor John Little, chair of the Media Arts and Technology department, will receive funds to enlist students to record and produce concert DVDs. The project will build upon previous concert recording initiatives and will serve to promote the academic program, as well as provide service learning and entrepreneurship opportunities for students. Little will collaborate Theatre at the Mount as well as the Graphic and Interactive Design, Media Services, and Marketing and Communications departments.

 

 

Yasmin Barroso, Jasson Alvarado, Anne Nash, and Mariah Courtemanche

Back-to-school activities included the 10th annual Summer Leadership Camp held in late August. Fifty incoming students participated in a variety of workshops and community service projects, including filling 77 backpacks of donated school supplies for Massachusetts children in foster care. Additional service projects took place at the Cleghorn Neighborhood Center in Fitchburg and Many Hands organic farm in Barre. Pictured, from left, Yasmin Barroso, Jasson Alvarado Gomez, Anne Nash and Mariah Courtemanche.

Many changes and new initiatives marked the start of the 2014-2015 academic year. Not only are the college’s campuses filled with thousands of new and returning students, but several faculty and staff members have joined the college community or stepped into new roles.

Approximately 950 new students participated in day, evening and program-specific orientations, marking a dynamic start to the academic year. The orientation sessions provide students with an opportunity to learn about college life and MWCC programs, support services, and activities.

A majority of the new day students attended orientation on Sept.2, which included seminars and other activities. Students met with faculty, deans and advisors, toured the campus, received information about college resources, and attended a student club expo. President Daniel M. Asquino and college administrators greeted the incoming students and encouraged them to become involved with campus activities and tap into college resources to make the most of their experience at MWCC.

Campus changes include several changes in the Division of Academic Affairs. Dr. Vincent Ialenti is serving the Interim Dean of Liberal Arts, Education, Humanities, and Communication through the academic year, and Missi Sargent has been appointed Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Veronica Guay, former Director of Dual Enrollment, has taken the position of Assistant Dean of the School of Business, Science, Technology and Math. Staff Associate Cheryl Oliveri has moved to the Office of Development, Planning and Research and Michelle Brennan has been appointed staff associate for the Division of Academic Affairs.

In the area of Student Services, long-serving adjunct instructor and Army veteran Bob Mayer steps into a new role as Director of Veteran Services, and will oversee MWCC’s Center of Excellence for Veteran Student Success.

Among the faculty changes, Cynthia Cadoret has been appointed assistant professor and chair of the dental hygiene and dental assisting programs, and Lisa Gendron has been appointed assistant professor in the associate degree nursing program. In addition, Maryjo Bowie was appointed professor and chair of the new Health Information Management program.

In the Division of Lifelong Learning and Workforce Development, Michael Watson was appointed an instructor with the Manufacturing and Quality Systems program, and Gretchen Ingvason was appointed senior learning specialist. In addition, Timothy Friend joined the MWCC Campus Police department as an officer.