Events

Henry_David_ThoreauThe ongoing MWCC Humanities Project, supported by a National Endowment for the Humanities challenge grant, will next welcome Thoreau Society Executive Director Michael Frederick for a lecture on Thoreau, Eastern philosophy and nonviolence. The hour-long lecture continues the project’s first year theme, “East Meets West in a Cabin in Concord: Walden and Beyond,” and will take place Tuesday, Nov. 18 at 12:30 p.m. in the Gardner campus’ North Café.

A Massachusetts-bred writer, philosopher and naturalist, Thoreau was a progressive thinker during the 1800s, opposing both slavery and the Mexican-American War. His refusal to pay the poll tax, which was imposed on all adults within a community and helped fund slavery, landed him in jail for one night in 1842.

In his essay “Civil Disobedience,” Thoreau writes, “If… the machine of government… is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then, I say, break the law.” This essay, coupled with Thoreau’s fundamental viewpoints, served as inspiration for such nonviolent reformers as Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.

The MWCC Humanities Project is a multi-year initiative to integrate annual themes in the humanities into campus curricula and community events. The first year features a slate of free events spotlighting various works written or inspired by Thoreau, as well as related student projects developed by several MWCC professors.

In 2013, MWCC received one of 173 NEH grants, which are awarded to recipients representing the highest level of humanities research and public engagement.

For more information about the MWCC Humanities Project and a full schedule of events, visit http://mwcc.edu/humanitiesproject.

 

Mount Wachusett Community College will host a free career fair, “Discover MWCC Certificate and Trade Programs,” on Thursday, Nov. 13 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at its Gardner campus, 444 Green Street. A career exploration workshop will take place at 6 p.m.

Information will be available on fast-growing occupations including cyber security, law enforcement, healthcare, hospitality, graphic and interactive design and manufacturing.

College representatives will be present to explain fast-track training and trade programs including veterinary assistant, advanced manufacturing, data analysis certificates, computer & technology, professional development and CPR.

Further information on certificate and degree programs, college services, financial aid and career counseling will be available. Attendees will also have the opportunity to speak with alumni, admissions representatives and professors, as well as tour the campus.

To register, visit mwcc.edu/rsvp, or contact the Admissions office at 978-630-9110 or email admissions@mwcc.mass.edu.

The Mount Wachusett Community College Humanities Project continues with a book discussion on Thoreau's modern connection to student debt.

The Mount Wachusett Community College Humanities Project continues Nov. 6 with a book discussion on Thoreau’s modern connection to student debt.

One author’s unconventional approach to repaying his student loans will be the focus of a Nov. 6 event for the Mount Wachusett Community College Humanities Project, supported by a National Endowment for the Humanities challenge grant.

Leominster Public Library will host a book discussion of Ken Ilgunas’ “Walden on Wheels: On the Open Road from Debt to Freedom” from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

In his book, Ilgunas describes adopting Henry David Thoreau’s frugal lifestyle to repay undergraduate student loans and enroll in a master’s program, while using his van as a makeshift dorm and avoiding further debt. The book discussion continues the Humanities Project’s first-year theme, “East Meets West in a Cabin in Concord: Walden and Beyond,” an ongoing discussion of Thoreau’s lasting relevance.

Thoreau famously lived an economical two years in a self-built cabin near Walden Pond in Concord, MA, immersing himself in nature and writing journal entries that would become “Walden.”

The MWCC Humanities Project is a multi-year initiative to integrate annual themes in the humanities into campus curricula and community events. The first year features a slate of free events spotlighting various works written or inspired by Thoreau, as well as related student projects developed by several MWCC professors.

In 2013, MWCC received one of 173 NEH grants, which are awarded to recipients representing the highest level of humanities research and public engagement.

For more information about the MWCC Humanities Project and a full schedule of events, visit http://mwcc.edu/humanitiesproject.

Olivia Hoblitzelle, author of "Ten Thousand Joys and Ten Thousand Sorrows: A Couple's Journey Through Alzheimer's," will speak at MWCC in honor of National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month.

Olivia Hoblitzelle, author of “Ten Thousand Joys and Ten Thousand Sorrows: A Couple’s Journey Through Alzheimer’s,” will speak at MWCC in honor of National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month.

In recognition of National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month in November, Mount Wachusett Community College and its Nursing Advisory Board will welcome author and Alzheimer’s caregiver Olivia Hoblitzelle. The presentation is free and open to the public and will take place on Thursday, Oct. 30 from 4 to 5 p.m. in the college’s theater.

Hoblitzelle, whose husband Harrison was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at the age of 72, offers a unique perspective on coping with the disease. Guided by their backgrounds in psychology, Buddhist meditations and the wisdom traditions, the Hoblitzelles chose to embrace the diagnosis and their remaining years together. Olivia Hoblitzelle details these experiences in her 2010 book, “Ten Thousand Joys and Ten Thousand Sorrows: A Couple’s Journey through Alzheimer’s.”

As a teacher in the field of behavioral medicine, Olivia Hoblitzelle pioneered the application of meditation, yoga and cognitive therapy into treatment for stress-related and chronic illnesses. In addition, she helped to develop one of the country’s first training programs in mind-body medicine. Prior to his death in 2001, Harrison Hoblitzelle taught comparative literature at Barnard, Columbia and Brandeis Universities and received the Dharmacharya, or senior mediation leader, transmission from Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thict Nhat Han.

Alzheimer’s Disease affects one in nine Americans aged 65 and older and one in three people over the age of 85, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. The association also reports that Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers paid an additional $9.3 billion in healthcare costs in 2013.

Upcoming Humanities Project events include a book discussion of“Cabin Fever: A Suburban Father’s Search for the Wild” and a performance by Thoreau re-enactor Richard Smith

Upcoming Humanities Project events include a book discussion of“Cabin Fever: A Suburban Father’s Search for the Wild” and a performance by Thoreau re-enactor Richard Smith.

The Mount Wachusett Community College Humanities Project, focusing this year on the lasting relevance of Henry David Thoreau, moves to the North Quabbin region on Tuesday, Oct. 28. Athol Public Library will host a book discussion of “Cabin Fever: A Suburban Father’s Search for the Wild” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Athol Public Library.

On Thursday, Oct. 30, the program returns to MWCC’s Gardner campus with a performance by Thoreau re-enactor Richard Smith of the Thoreau Society from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the college’s theater.

In his book Cabin Fever, author Tom Montgomery Fate documents his own life, drawing inspiration from the philosophies of writer and abolitionist Thoreau and applying them to the present day. In perhaps his most literal application of Thoreau’s lifestyle, Fate divides his time between his family’s Chicago home and a cabin in the Michigan woods, which he built with the help of friends. Thoreau famously lived for two years in a self-built cabin near Walden Pond in Concord, MA, immersing himself in nature and writing the book “Walden.”

Originally from Ohio, Thoreau re-enactor Richard Smith is also a regular at Walden Pond and the Thoreau Society Annual Gathering and has performed at schools, colleges and historical venues throughout the country.

A Massachusetts-bred writer, philosopher and naturalist, Thoreau was a progressive thinker during the 1800s, opposing both slavery and the Mexican-American War. His refusal to pay the poll tax, which was imposed on all adults within a community and helped fund slavery, landed him in jail for one night in 1842. Known for his blunt honesty and sense of humor, Thoreau was also a disciple of Ralph Waldo Emerson and a lover of the natural world, even labeling Mount Wachusett “the observatory of the state.”

Established through a challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the MWCC Humanities Project will feature a full slate of free events spotlighting various works written or inspired by Thoreau. The project also includes a campus-wide initiative at MWCC, as the college works to integrate enduring themes raised by Thoreau into multiple academic disciplines and curricula.

For more information about the MWCC Humanities Project and a full schedule of events, visit http://mwcc.edu/humanitiesproject.

Remillard art exhibit

“Don’t Steal the Show,” an exhibition of artwork by Mount Wachusett Community College alumnus Michael Remillard is on display through Oct. 31 in the East Wing Gallery. Regular gallery hours are Mondaythrough Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Chris JasonFor one night, Theatre at the Mount will become “Sinatra at the Mount,” as Mount Wachusett Community College welcomes Chris Jason and the Sinatra Live Big Band on Friday, Oct. 24 at 7:30 p.m.

Jason is considered one of the premier Sinatra interpreters in New England and has been performing as the “Chairman of the Board” for the last 15 years. Along with his eight-member band, Jason plays tribute to Sinatra over 200 times per year, capturing the legendary singer’s cadence, swagger and elegance.

This benefit concert presented by the MWCC Foundation will provide continued scholarship support to deserving students.

General admission tickets are $40. VIP tickets are also available for $80, which includes reserved seating and a complimentary cocktail reception.

Tickets are available by email, phone or at the Theatre at the Mount Box Office Monday through Friday between 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. Email cdefosse1@mwcc.mass.edu, or call 978-630-9387 or 978-630-9276.

Event sponsors include North Middlesex Savings Bank, Heat Trace Products LLC, Heywood Hospital, W.E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Simonds International Corporation, GFA Credit Union and Nashoba Valley Chamber of Commerce.

For more information about Theatre at the Mount, visit mwcc.edu/tam. To learn more about Chris Jason and the Sinatra Live Big Band, visit chrisjasonentertainment.com.

 

Scary Karaoke

September 30, 2014

MWCC’s annual Scary Karaoke competition, sponsored by CATS and the Student Life Office, will take place on Thursday, Oct. 23, from 6 to 9 p.m. in the North Café. Come join in on the spooky fun! There will be snacks, a $100 cash door prize every hour and cash prizes ($100, $70, $30) for the best costumes.

Domestic Violence Exhibit

September 30, 2014

The Empty Place at the Table exhibit, commemorating Massachusetts residents lost in the last year as a result of domestic violence, comes to MWCC from Tuesday, Oct. 14 to Friday, Oct. 17. Created by Battered Women’s Resources, Inc., this dining-room-table display features two plates for each victim, one with a name and the other with a brief description of the murder. This four-day event is sponsored by the Student Life office and will take place in the Commons Area of the Gardner campus.

Michael Reyes Performance

September 30, 2014

In recognition of National Hispanic Heritage Month, MWCC and the Student Life office will welcome back activist, poet and hip-hop artist Michael Reyes to the Gardner campus’ North Café on Tuesday, Oct. 14 at 12:30 p.m. A leading voice in progressive and radical music, Reyes combines cultural stories of resistance, raw hip-hop and inspiring poems, to reach youth and elders alike. Reyes, who is of Mexican descent, has performed for both American and international audiences. Attendees will also be treated to authentic Spanish cuisine. Admission is free.