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Nursing Class of 2014

Members of the 2014 Nursing Class are among the state and region’s newest health care employees.

Mount Wachusett Community College, its students and alumni add more than $207 million in income each year to North Central Massachusetts and the Commonwealth, according to a newly released regional economic impact report.The study, prepared for the college by Economic Modeling Specialists, Inc., involved a regional economic impact analysis and an investment analysis during the 2012-2013 fiscal year. According to the findings, MWCC promotes economic growth in the 29 cities and towns that comprise its service area in a variety of ways. The college is one of the region’s largest employers, it is a buyer of goods and services, is a primary source of education to local residents, and supplies local industry with trained workers.MWCC creates a significant positive impact on the local business community and generates a return on investment to its major stakeholder groups – students, society and taxpayers. During the analysis year, income created by MWCC as a result of college operations equaled $37.8 million and income created as the result of student productivity equaled $169.8 million, for a total effect of $207.6 million.

“The role of community colleges as economic engines has long been recognized and this study provides updated data on the positive impact MWCC has in our region and the state,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “We enroll more than 12,000 credit and noncredit students each year, and the majority of our alumni remain in the region and in the state to contribute to the local economy.”

The return on investment to students, society and taxpayers is significant, the report found. Students paid a total of $16.2 million to cover the cost of tuition, fees, books and supplies during the analysis year. In return for their investment, students will receive a present value of $409.5 million in increased earnings over their working lives. This translates to a return of $6.30 in higher future income for every $1 that students invest in their education, for an average annual return for students of 25.4 percent.

Society as a whole in Massachusetts will receive a present value of $955.3 million in added state income over the course of the students’ working lives. Society will also benefit from $15.3 million in present value social savings related to reduced crime, lower unemployment and increased health and well-being across the state. For every dollar that society spent on MWCC educations during the analysis year, society will receive a cumulative value of $9.80 in benefits, for as long as MWCC’s 2012-13 students remain active in the state workforce.

From the taxpayer perspective, state taxpayers invested $16.3 million to support the operations of MWCC. The net present value of added tax revenue stemming from the students’ higher lifetime incomes and the increased output of business amounts to $78.6 million in benefits to taxpayers. Savings to the public sector add another $4.5 million in benefits due to the reduced demand for government-funded services in Massachusetts. By dividing benefits to taxpayers by the associated costs, the average annual return on investment for taxpayers is 13.2 percent, or $5.10 in benefits for every $1.

Other highlights include:

  • MWCC employed a total of 1,069 faculty and staff in FY2012-13. Payroll amounted to $32.7 million, much of which was spent in the MWCC service region to purchase groceries, clothing and other household goods and services. The college spent another $14.3 million to support its day-to-day operations.
  • The net impact of college payroll and expenses in the MWCC service region during the analysis year was approximately $37.8 million in added regional income.
  • Overall, the added income created by MWCC and its students supported 3,294 job equivalents in the region.

 

MWCC ice bucket challenge

President Daniel Asquino is doused by Executive Vice President Ann McDonald during MWCC’s ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in memory of colleague Glenn Roberts.

Twenty-four MWCC employees, including President Daniel M. Asquino, lined up for the ice bucket challenge in memory of beloved colleague Glenn Roberts, who died a year ago on Aug. 12, 2013 after a courageous battle with the disease. The effort, organized by Access & Transition Staff Assistant Jessica Connors on behalf of “Glenn’s Friends,” raised more than $2,600 for the Massachusetts chapter of the ALS Association in honor of Roberts, who worked as an advisor and dean at the college for 21 years.

One by one, participants were drenched by a friend, colleague or family member who bid highest for the opportunity to tip a bucket. After being soaked by her young son, Executive Vice President Ann McDonald had the privilege of dousing the president.

“I’m challenging the other community colleges to get involved and raise just as much for ALS,” President Asquino announced.

In addition to President Asquino, Executive Vice President McDonald and Connors, other volunteers included Vice President Bob LaBonte, Vice President Lea Ann Scales, Kerrie Griffin, Kyla Holland, Jo-Anne Cronin-Fors, Scott Farris, Julie Crowley, Sue Guartafierro, Eric Johnson, Charity Cooley, Kate Smith, John Walsh, Michele Levasseur Goderre, Jim Halkola, Peggy Dow, Brenda Bourgeois, Lawrence Nfor, Chrystal Voorheis, Denise Whitney, Maryann Kane and Lexie Stewart.

To view the video, click here.

Bionostics Floyd 2Mount Wachusett Community College has been awarded a $75,000 grant from the Community Foundation of North Central Massachusetts to support student scholarships. This grant comes from the Community Foundation’s General Endowment Education Access Fund, and will specifically support MWCC’s Career Focused Education Scholarship Program.

The scholarship partnership between MWCC and the Community Foundation will support students enrolled in Advanced Manufacturing, Biotechnology, or a credit certificate program for career improvement, such as Certified Nursing Assistant, Emergency Medical Technician programs, as well as newly established programs Analytical Laboratory and Quality Systems, Cyber Security and Hospitality.

To qualify, students must live in North Central Massachusetts, demonstrate financial need, and be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. Award amounts will vary.

“We are very grateful to the Community Foundation for this award to support students as they pursue their academic and career goals,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “The vast majority of our students remain in the area after graduating to live and work, so this funding ultimately helps strengthen our local communities as well as the economic vitality of our region.”

The grant was announced Aug. 8 by the Community Foundation, which awarded $293,000 to 23 organizations

The Community Foundation of North Central Massachusetts is a nonprofit, community, corporation created by and for the people of greater North Central Massachusetts. They help philanthropic donors make a positive impact on their community. The Community Foundation General Endowment Education Access Fund supports community development, environment, animal welfare, arts and culture, as well as health and human services.

UBMS 2014 student group

UBMS Director Angele Goss and State Rep. Jon Zlotnick are joined by this year’s Upward Bound Math and Science students during the program’s recent year-end celebration.

Dozens of area high school students from Gardner, Athol and Winchendon were recently recognized for their academic success in Mount Wachusett Community College’s Upward Bound Math and Science program, a federal TRIO program celebrating its 50th anniversary this year.

Sixty-three students participated in the program’s summer residential component, which included dual enrollment courses, extracurricular activities, career exploration and field trips and took place at Fitchburg State University.

State Rep. Jon Zlotnik of Gardner was the keynote speaker. Lea Ann Scales, MWCC Vice President of Access, Transition and Development delivered a welcome from the college. UBMS Director Angele Goss and program coordinator Ralph Hogan also congratulated the students on their success.

“The six-week residential UBMS program provides a great environment for students to grow academically, socially and culturally,” said Angele Goss Director of Upward Bound Math Science and the North Central Mass Talent Search program, both offered through MWCC’s Division of Access and Transition. “We build a small supportive community that allows student to take positive risks toward educational and personal development.”

The program is offered to students who have an aptitude for math and science and are in grades 9 through 12 at Gardner High School, Athol High School and Murdock Memorial Middle/Senior High School in Winchendon. Two thirds of the students are from low income or first-generation college families and have an identified need for services.

During the summer, students dual enrolment courses in biology, psychology and English and attended a leadership conference, career roundtable, a variety of recreational and educational, career building workshops. The also learned languages from Rosetta Stone, Spanish, Korean, Mandarin and Italian, participated in community service. Other summer highlights include trips to several colleges and universities, Boston, Mystic Seaport, a talent show and family fun night.

MWCC’s North Central Massachusetts Upward Bound Math and Science program began in 2008 with a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. In 2012, the college received a five-year, $1.3 million grant to continue funding the program. Now completing its seventh year at the college, the program prepares high school students from Gardner, Athol, and Winchendon for success in high school and college in the fields of math and science.

The primary goal of the program is to prepare high school students for postsecondary education programs that lead to careers in the fields of math and science. The program provides a comprehensive academic year, summer and bridge program during the-five year period that is customized to the needs of each participant. On Saturdays and school vacations during the academic year, students  participate in college tours, monthly science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)-based cultural/academic enrichment opportunities, hands-on laboratory activities; STEM-based field trip, lectures and other activities.

The students also receive individual success plan development and follow-up meetings with academic counselors and program aides, secondary school course selection advising, after-school tutoring, guidance and assistance, alternative education programs, parent/guardian workshops, e-mentoring and workshops.

Freshmen and sophomores have access to state-mandated test preparation and a career fair and roundtable, while juniors and seniors have access to dual enrollment courses, SAT and ACT preparation, Accuplacer preparation, a college fair, college admission assistance, financial aid assistance, and postsecondary course selection advising during the academic year.

 

 

Summer UP 2014 Gardner

MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino, Gardner Mayor Mark Hawke and Gardner Superintendent Denise Clemens are thanked by members of MWCC’s Access & Transition staff, camp counselors and participants at the Jackson Playground site.

Summer UP, an MWCC Access & Transition program that began a decade ago to provide safe, summertime activities and employment opportunities to area youth, enhanced this year’s program with new career and college preparation training opportunities.

Now completing its 10th season, Summer UP this year provided 110 of area high school and middle school students with jobs as camp counselors at eight park sites in Leominster, Fitchburg, and Gardner. The counselors, who earn a stipend, worked with MWCC staff to provide supervised recreation activities for approximately 500 area school children of all ages, who attend the free activities.

“We’ve made a lot of modifications this year,” said Patrice Lincoln, Dean of Access and Transition. Among the changes for the program’s counselors, high school juniors and seniors enrolled in free summer dual enrollment courses, and the Commonwealth Corps’ 20-hour Signaling Success employment training program is now incorporated into the counselor training, along with park safety training, college preparation opportunities, and field trips.

Visitors during the five week program included Gardner Mayor Mark Hawke and Gardner’s new Superintendent of Schools Denise Clemens at the Jackson Park site, as well as town and school officials in Leominster.

In operation since the summer of 2005, Summer UP is a collaborative effort between MWCC’s Division of Access and Transition, the Mayors’ offices of the cities of Fitchburg, Leominster and Gardner, as well as various community based agencies. While providing safe recreational spaces for five weeks each summer, the program was designed to lower risky behavior and increase employment opportunities for area students. The objectives are to increase leadership, citizenship and college readiness skills for students and to ensure a safe, healthy, summer experience for at-risk children. MWCC staff assists youth employees in implementing daily craft, sports, and reading activities at each park site.

 

manufacturingThe long-standing collaboration between MWCC, the North Central Massachusetts Workforce Investment Board, and industry is showcased as a model demonstrating best practices for building and sustaining regional partnership in a new video created by the Advanced Manufacturing Regional Partnership Academy (AMRPA).

MWCC, known for its well established partnerships with corporations such as Nypro and Bristol-Myers Squibb and the recipient of a recent $15.9 million, multi-state grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, is featured in the video along with the North Central Massachusetts Chamber of Commerce, the North Central Workforce Investment Board and Nypro, Inc.

MWCC’s vice President of Lifelong Learning Jacqueline Belrose; Dean of Workforce Development John Henshaw; Kathleen Kirby, National Consortium Project Manager of of the TAACCCT-funded Advanced Manufacturing & Quality Consortium, are among the college officials interviewed in the video. The video was one of three unveiled during an AMRPA meeting in June.

The academy brings together manufacturers, workforce investment boards and academia to help regions throughout the state develop sustainable and effective partnerships that respond to industry needs.

Established by Gov. Deval Patrick in 2013 to accelerate the adoption of best practices, capacity building and industry engagement, the academy is a collaborative effort of the Advanced Manufacturing Collaborative, the Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development, the Executive Office of Education, the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, and the University of Massachusetts. The academy is funded by MassDevelopment through the Advanced Manufacturing Futures Fund.

 

 

Mary Bergevin, Paula D'Entremont, and Sue Hermanson

MWCC’s first nursing program Director Paula d’Entremont, center, with members of the first graduating class, Mary Bergevin and Sue Hermanson.

Alumni, faculty and staff of the MWCC Nursing Program gathered on June 25 at the Gardner Campus to reconnect and celebrate four decades of nursing education at MWCC. Alumni in attendance were representative of each decade since the program was established.

Mary Bergevin and Susan Hermanson were on hand to represent the first graduating class of 1974. ”This is absolutely wonderful seeing everyone together” commented Ms. Hermanson. “It took 40 years, but was well worth the wait.”  Mary Bergevin remarked that “It is exciting to reflect on the differences and advances that have been made when comparing how we learned with what the students have available to them today.”

The event featured a session on “Laughter Yoga” as well as tours of the new Sim Lab and information about continuing education programs.

Judy Fredette, ADN Nursing Program Chair who organized the event, commented ”It is exciting for us, as faculty, to reconnect with our former students and retired colleagues to find out how they are doing in life, to learn if they ever went beyond MWCC in their education, where they are working now, what we did right and what we can do better.”

Many in attendance expressed their wishes to make the Nursing Alumni Reunion a regular event. If interested in helping to plan future events, please email alumni@mwcc.mass.edu.

- Carol Jacobson

Linda Coyne

Linda Coyne has enrolled in MWCC’s new Health Information Management program to blend her existing computer technology experience with her emerging interest in healthcare.

Mount Wachusett Community College is rolling out several new and revised academic programs to prepare students for a wide range of careers.

“We’re excited about these new opportunities for our students,” said Dr. Melissa Fama, Vice President of Academic Affairs. “The new and redesigned programs will serve needs expressed by local employers and students will be better prepared to enter the workforce or transfer, so this is a win-win for our region.”

Health Information Management, Hospitality, Cyber Security, Analytical Laboratory and Quality Systems, and Liberal Arts programs with STEM concentrations in biological science, chemical science, physics and pre-engineering are among the additional degree and certificate offerings available when the new academic year begins in September.

Existing programs that underwent changes to align with the most current industry trends include Graphics and Interactive Design (formerly Computer Graphic Design-Print/Web); Media Arts and Technology (formerly Broadcasting & Electronic Media); Energy Management; and Medical Coding.

As part of college initiatives focused on the STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Mount Wachusett has added new concentrations in these disciplines to its existing Liberal Arts and Sciences programs.

The Liberal Arts Biological Science concentration provides students with the first two years of a typical biology program so they can transfer into a bachelor’s degree program as juniors. This associate degree may also be used as a pre-professional program for aspiring physicians, veterinarians, dentists, and pharmacists.

Similarly, the Liberal Arts Chemical Sciences and Liberal Arts with Physics or Pre-Engineering provides students the first two years of a standard college courses in preparation for transfer into four-year programs as juniors and ensuing careers.

In response to new federal laws regulating how medical records and medical coding structures are maintained, MWCC has developed an associate degree program in the expanding field of Health Information Management. Individuals working in HIM play a key role in ensuring that healthcare organizations are compliant with state and federal regulations regarding capture, storage, and release of all medical data.

This field is seeing rapid expansion that will require significant new hiring of HIM-credentialed people to meet workforce needs over the next decade. In this career, individuals with an interest in the medical field and information technology skills contribute greatly to the healthcare industry without being direct care providers.

Several certificate programs have been added to the college’s short-term academic programs. The Analytical Laboratory and Quality Systems certificate program prepares students to gain entry level positions as laboratory and quality technicians for manufacturing companies and other organizations. Example positions include quality inspectors, calibration technicians, quality control analysts, document control technicians and manufacturing production technicians.

The Cyber Security certificate helps students launch a career in information technology security. In this program, students learn how to install operating systems and applications and study networking topics, as well as learn how to secure and protect these technologies against possible exploits and attacks. Students may use this certificate as preparation for the CompTIA Security+ SYO-201 exam or as a foundation for ongoing security studies.

The new Hospitality certificate program provides students with a strong foundation in the hospitality industry. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, jobs in this field are projected to increase an average of 15.5 percent through 2018.

Faculty at Thoreau cabin

Faculty participating in the NEH Summer Academy tour a replica of Henry David Thoreau’s cabin at Walden Pond in Concord.

In late May, a group of 30 MWCC educators spent a day walking the trails at Walden Pond in Concord, where 19th century author, philosopher, naturalist and abolitionist Henry David Thoreau lived in a cabin for two years, two months and two days writing his most famous works.

The visit was part of a week-long summer academy to prepare for an upcoming year-long, multi-disciplinary learning project devoted to the author’s influence and relevance to students today. In 2013, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) awarded the college a challenge grant of $500,000 to endow the “MWCC Humanities Initiative” to deepen and sustain quality humanities programming and curriculum in North Central Massachusetts. The grant will be matched with funds raised by the MWCC Foundation to endow the initiative over the next six years. Thoreau’s Walden or Life in the Woods is at the center of the Humanities Project first year’s theme. Other authors and topics will be selected in subsequent years.

“The summer academy was very successful,” said English Professor Michelle Valois, chair of the college’s General Studies department and coordinator of the NEH grant project. “Faculty had the opportunity to collaborate on teaching and learning and they had the chance to grow intellectually. For some, Thoreau was new ground and they embraced the chance to be a student again. We also explored active learning, developing new ways to engage students in class discussion, and collaborative group work.”

Thoreau considered himself as much a scientist as a poet, Valois said. His scientific observations and inquiries are still relevant today and have given rise to the “citizen science” movement. He was also deeply influenced by Eastern religious and philosophical thought at a time when globalization was not a buzzword. And of course, Thoreau, the creator of the modern concept of civil disobedience, provides a perfect vehicle for examining the power and responsibility of the individual citizen in a healthy democracy, she said.

The academy provided guidance and inspiration as participating faculty prepare to integrate Thoreau and his works into cross-college disciplines, including English, biology, business administration, nursing, sociology, graphic design, early childhood education, photography and math.

Summer Academy Walden group photo

Professor Michelle Valois, coordinator of the new MWCC Humanities Initiative, leads a discussion during a faculty visit to Walden Pond in Concord, where Henry David Thoreau penned one of his most famous works, Walden or Life in the Woods. The book will be the focus of the Humanities Project’s first year’s theme.

Guest speakers and faculty participants presented lectures throughout the week. Michael Frederick, executive director of the Thoreau Society, spoke of Thoreau’s views of eastern philosophy and non-violence. Thoreau Society board member Susan Gallagher, associate professor in the political science department at UMass, Lowell, presented “Mapping Thoreau Country,” which followed Thoreau’s extensive travels through New England. Corinne Smith, author of, “Westward I Go Free: Tracing Thoreau’s Last Journey,” spoke on “Thoreau’s Relevance for Today.”

Several events, which are free and open to the public, are planned for the upcoming academic year including book discussions, lectures, a presentation by a Thoreau re-enactor, student presentations and a fundraising walk replicating Thoreau’s 1842 ascent up Wachusett Mountain, which was described in his  essay, A Walk to Wachusett.

“Wachusett is, in fact, the observatory of the state,” Thoreau wrote in his essay.

“That’s quite an honor for our little mountain, just as the NEH grant is an honor for our college,” Valois said.

 -         Alexander P. Moore

Dental programs tour June 2014

Incoming dental hygiene freshmen Paulette Hachey, Jessica Charron and Monica Kwan check out an operatory during a tour of MWCC’s new dental programs center in Fitchburg.

MWCC’s dental programs moved to spacious, new quarters in June, giving students, faculty and patients plenty to smile about.

The dental programs are now located at 326 Nichols Road in Fitchburg, adjacent to the original site at HealthAlliance Hospital, Burbank campus. The new facility is housed within the Community Health Connections’ newly opened, $20 million Fitchburg Family Community Health Center and continues a long-standing partnership with CHC that enables students to work with dentists and patients.

“It’s new and a pleasant, professional and inviting environment that welcomes students and patients alike,” said dental programs Director Anne Malkasian. “It’s a nice, welcoming facility to deliver good quality care in.”

The new space accommodates the growing dental programs, Malkasian said. In addition to containing the program’s seven operatories used for patient care, the new facility provides a larger classroom, designated space for space a dental materials lab, a library, offices and storage.

Students enrolled in the college’s part-time, evening dental assisting program will begin using the new facility this summer. Second-year dental hygiene students and freshmen entering the full-time, dental hygiene program in September had the opportunity to tour the new site on June 18 during their program orientation.

“The building is beautiful and we’ve all been very excited to start our second year here,” said continuing student Tasey Lemieux of Gardner.

Paulette Hachey of Fitchburg, who began her academic studies at MWCC as an English as a Second Language student, is excited to begin her dental hygiene program in the new facility this fall.

“It’s beautiful in here. It looks more like a dentist’s office than a school.

Malkasian, who plans to retire in the fall, said the move to the new location was a rewarding chapter in her career. She praised the CHC and its new chief executive officer, John DeMalia, for bringing the project to fruition and enhancing medical care for area residents.

“This is the medical and dental home for thousands of patients and it’s nice to have a beautiful facility for them,” she said.

During the past academic year, students in MWCC’s dental programs conducted fundraisers to contribute to the Community Health Connections Homestretch campaign to provide for additional clinical space and other building improvements. For more information about the campaign, visit www.thehomestretchcampaign.org.