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Yasmin Barroso, Jasson Alvarado, Anne Nash, and Mariah Courtemanche

Back-to-school activities included the 10th annual Summer Leadership Camp held in late August. Fifty incoming students participated in a variety of workshops and community service projects, including filling 77 backpacks of donated school supplies for Massachusetts children in foster care. Additional service projects took place at the Cleghorn Neighborhood Center in Fitchburg and Many Hands organic farm in Barre. Pictured, from left, Yasmin Barroso, Jasson Alvarado Gomez, Anne Nash and Mariah Courtemanche.

Many changes and new initiatives marked the start of the 2014-2015 academic year. Not only are the college’s campuses filled with thousands of new and returning students, but several faculty and staff members have joined the college community or stepped into new roles.

Approximately 950 new students participated in day, evening and program-specific orientations, marking a dynamic start to the academic year. The orientation sessions provide students with an opportunity to learn about college life and MWCC programs, support services, and activities.

A majority of the new day students attended orientation on Sept.2, which included seminars and other activities. Students met with faculty, deans and advisors, toured the campus, received information about college resources, and attended a student club expo. President Daniel M. Asquino and college administrators greeted the incoming students and encouraged them to become involved with campus activities and tap into college resources to make the most of their experience at MWCC.

Campus changes include several changes in the Division of Academic Affairs. Dr. Vincent Ialenti is serving the Interim Dean of Liberal Arts, Education, Humanities, and Communication through the academic year, and Missi Sargent has been appointed Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Veronica Guay, former Director of Dual Enrollment, has taken the position of Assistant Dean of the School of Business, Science, Technology and Math. Staff Associate Cheryl Oliveri has moved to the Office of Development, Planning and Research and Michelle Brennan has been appointed staff associate for the Division of Academic Affairs.

In the area of Student Services, long-serving adjunct instructor and Army veteran Bob Mayer steps into a new role as Director of Veteran Services, and will oversee MWCC’s Center of Excellence for Veteran Student Success.

Among the faculty changes, Cynthia Cadoret has been appointed assistant professor and chair of the dental hygiene and dental assisting programs, and Lisa Gendron has been appointed assistant professor in the associate degree nursing program. In addition, Maryjo Bowie was appointed professor and chair of the new Health Information Management program.

In the Division of Lifelong Learning and Workforce Development, Michael Watson was appointed an instructor with the Manufacturing and Quality Systems program, and Gretchen Ingvason was appointed senior learning specialist. In addition, Timothy Friend joined the MWCC Campus Police department as an officer.

 

 

 

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MWCC art major Amber Martinez participates in a Raku firing at Snow Farm Craft Center in Williamsburg, Mass. With funding provided by the MWCC Foundation, the art department will create an area on the Gardner campus for Raku and pit-firing ceramics.

With the start of the new academic year, the Mount Wachusett Community College Foundation has provided funds totaling $46,044 for eight innovative projects conceived by college faculty and staff.

“Current community college funding is such that we are often left wishing we had more resources to experiment with new and innovative pilot programs that have the potential to dramatically alter or create new opportunities for our students and the community,” said MWCC Foundation Executive Director Carla DeFosse. “The Innovation Fund allows us to financially support inventive staff and faculty and give them the opportunity to implement their concepts.”

Dean of Students Jason Zelesky will collaborate with the offices of Disability Services, Student Services and the Visions program to acquire new adaptive technology equipment to support students with documented disabilities. Enhancing the college’s inventory of assistive technologies will enhance academic success and encourage more students with disabilities to attend MWCC. The project will emphasize iOS applications and provide five iPads for student use in the classroom and during tutoring sessions.

Art Professor Joyce Miller received funding to create a program and fundraiser centered on Raku, a pottery tradition dating back to 16thcentury Japan. Available to art majors and non-art majors, as well as credit and noncredit students, the equipment will enhance the college’s art department to further attract prospective students. An exterior area will be designated for Raku and pit-firing ceramics. In addition to supporting the college’s art program, the equipment will support area high school art programs and their students by offering field trip opportunities and chances to participate in pit-firing or Raku firing, which in turn will assist with college recruitment.

Veronica Guay, Assistant Dean of Business, Science, Technology and Mathematics, and Perkins Counselor Shaunti Phillips, Career Vocational/Technical Education, will receive funding to create a new dual enrollment program for Gardner High School seniors interested in graphic and interactive design. Guay and Phillips will partner with Professor Leslie Cullen, chair of the Graphic & Interactive Design department; Natasha Robinson, Recruitment Counselor for the Admissions office; and members of the Gardner High School system.

Interim Director of Admissions Ai Co Abercrombie was awarded a grant to develop a peer-to-peer recruitment program, specifically targeting first-time students from traditionally underrepresented population groups: low-income and minority students and students with disabilities. The Admissions office plans to employ two student recruiters, one of traditional college age and one of non-traditional college age, who will accompany admissions representatives to college fairs, events and community activities and perform additional recruitment tasks.

Director of Student Success Debra Boucher received funding for a new program supporting non-traditional students as they transition to college life. The first portion of this program, a summer bridge session for non-traditional students and students returning to school following a five-year absence, took place in August. Incoming students learned about available resources at the college, while also participating in team-building activities. The program will continue this fall, as students attend two meetings to evaluate their college experiences and participate in leadership-building activities. Boucher is partnering with Student Services, the Visions program, the Advising Center and the Admissions office.

Lauren Mountain, Associate Director of the United Way Youth Venture in the college’s Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement, received funding to further develop immersive learning opportunities for MWCC students. Along with her colleagues in the Center for Civic Learning and Community Engagement, Mountain will use funding to support student ventures that create tangible changes in the community and at the college, similar to the Youth Venture program that has long served middle and high school students. This initiative is designed to promote retention and involvement at MWCC, enhance the educational experience for students, and provide them with community contacts and job skills.

Professor Sheila Murphy will partner with the Admissions office to further promote the benefits of the Honors Program and increase awareness among incoming students. By continuing to shape and market this honors culture, Murphy hopes to attract prospective students to MWCC and motivate them to participate in the many challenging degree programs. Further program goals include emerging as a top destination for students who excel in high school. To increase first-year student enrollment and eligibility for the Honors Program, Murphy will also partner with the Marketing and Communications department and the Dual Enrollment program.

Associate Professor John Little, chair of the Media Arts and Technology department, will receive funds to enlist students to record and produce concert DVDs. The project will build upon previous concert recording initiatives and will serve to promote the academic program, as well as provide service learning and entrepreneurship opportunities for students. Little will collaborate Theatre at the Mount as well as the Graphic and Interactive Design, Media Services, and Marketing and Communications departments.

 

 

Thoreau quote sign

Along the trails at Walden Pond in Concord.

This month, Mount Wachusett Community College launches “East Meets West in a Cabin in Concord: Walden and Beyond,” the first year of a multi-year, college and community project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The MWCC Humanities Project will begin with a book discussion on Walden, or Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau, famed Massachusetts author and the focus of this year’s initiative. Led by MWCC English Professors Michelle Valois and Susan Blake, the discussion will take place Wednesday, Sept. 17 from 6:30 to 8p.m. in the Commons Area of the college’s Gardner campus and is the first in a full slate of free events taking place this fall at venues throughout North Central Massachusetts.

Other upcoming events include a fundraising hike at Wachusett Mountain, a performance by a Thoreau re-enactor, and additional lectures and book discussions on the lasting relevance of Thoreau. Established through a $500,000 challenge grant the college received from the NEH,  the project will continue through 2019 with a new theme each academic year.

In late May, 30 MWCC educators spent a day walking the trails at Walden Pond in Concord, where Thoreau lived in a cabin for two years writing Walden, one of his most famous works. The visit was part of a week-long academy to prepare for the multi-disciplinary learning project devoted to the author’s influence and relevance to today’s students.

“Thoreau considered himself as much a scientist as a poet,” said Professor Valois, chair of the college’s Liberal Arts and Sciences and General Studies department and coordinator of the NEH project. “Thoreau’s scientific observations and inquiries are still relevant today and have given rise to the ‘citizen science’ movement. And as the creator of the modern concept of civil disobedience, Thoreau provides a perfect vehicle for examining the power and responsibility of the individual citizen in a healthy democracy.”

The program will continue with: “What Thoreau Can Teach Us about Climate Change,” a lecture led by Susan Gallagher of the University of Massachusetts, Lowell on Wednesday, Oct. 1 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Levi Heywood Memorial Library in Gardner; a screening of the film Into the Wild on Tuesday, Oct. 7 from 12:30 to 2:45 p.m. in Room 127 of MWCC Gardner campus; “Thoreau’s Relevance for Our Time,” a lecture led by writer and independent Thoreau scholar Corinne Smith, on Thursday, Oct. 9 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the North Cafeteria at the Gardner campus; A Hike for the Humanities matching grant fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 18 at 9 a.m., reenacting Thoreau’s 1842 hike at Wachusett Mountain; a book discussion of Tom Montgomery Fate’s Cabin Fever: A Suburban Father’s Search for the Wild on Tuesday, Oct. 28 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Athol Public Library; and a performance by Thoreau re-enactor Richard Smith of the Thoreau Society on Thursday, Oct. 30 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the theater at MWCC’s Gardner campus.

Fall events will continue with a book discussion of Ken Ilgunas’Walden on Wheels: On the Open Road from Debt to Freedom on Nov. 6 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Leominster Public Library; a lecture on “Thoreau: Eastern Philosophy and Non-Violence,” by Michael Frederick, Executive Director of the Thoreau Society, on Tuesday, Nov. 18 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the North Cafeteria at the Gardner campus; and an exhibit with student presentations on Thursday, Dec. 4 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., also at the Gardner campus.

Spring activities will include additional book discussions and a poetry reading. For more information about the program and upcoming events, visit http://mwcc.edu/humanitiesproject.

Johnny Appleseed bench project

President Daniel Asquino and Art Professor Tom Matsuda pose in the East Wing Gallery with art students who participated in the Johnny Appleseed Country project. Seated: Jenifer Porcine, Corinne Goodrich and Michelle Gangnon; Back row: Tom Hill, President Asquino, Ben Mikels, Leandro Lopez and Professor Matsuda.

“Take a Seat in Johnny Appleseed Country” is a community project aimed at increasing foot traffic in the cities and towns that make up North Central Massachusetts. The Johnny Appleseed Trail Association met with the Wachusett Mountain Ski Resort and rather than throw away inoperative ski lift chairs, both organizations decided to use them as a promotional opportunity.

Six chairs were delivered to Montachusett Regional Technical School where they were refurbished and converted by students into functional benches. Then, they were delivered to Mount Wachusett Community College this summer, where they were painted by art students. MWCC Professor Tom Matsuda, chair of the art department, said he the students were excited to participate.  The chairs will be distributed in the region this fall.

Corinne Goodrich, a student involved with the project, said painting the bench was a challenge she enjoyed. “I think the project is honoring someone who was a remarkable person.”

Art student Tom Hill said he is new to creating art that will be seen by the public. “It’s been pretty fun. I don’t think I’ve ever done a project quite like this.” Student Ben Mikles said he likes any reason to have to create art. Any art created for the public is nice because it gets the artist’s name out in the open, he said.

“People like public art and this is really functional public art that can be sat on,” said Matt Myers, marketing and communications specialist for the Johnny Appleseed Trail Association. “As art students, one of the best things to do is get your work out there,” he said. ”All the students will have there names on the back of the chairs that they designed.”

Myers wanted the students to have their own individual style on the chairs, so he left the theme open for interpretation.

“The only guidelines given to the artists was to make it something relatable to North Central Massachusetts, whether that means a Johnny Appleseed themed bench or one that serves to represent the four seasons that are such a major part of life in the northeast,” Myers said. “I wanted to keep a general theme, that way the artists imagination would be given an opening to really express who they are and their connection to the area.”

From Wachusett Mountain, which has been a staple in the area for over 50 years, to students at Monty Tech and MWCC, the  Take a Seat in Johnny Appleseed Country project incorporates layers of community involvement to create ”something special,” Myers said.

- Alexander P. Moore

 

Aliza Miller

Aliza Miller

Mount Wachusett Community College Assistant Professor of Mathematics Aliza Miller has been selected as a Project ACCCESS Fellow with the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC).

Project ACCCESS (Advancing Community College Careers: Education, Scholarship, and Services), is a professional development and mentoring program for mathematics professors at two-year colleges. Miller, selected to participate in a cohort of 24 math educators, will develop, implement and evaluate educational projects at MWCC and collaborate electronically with colleagues in the cohort.

“I am very excited and proud to have this opportunity, which I view as a wonderful stepping stone in my career,” said Miller, who joins Project ACCCESS in its eleventh year. “By working within a network of individuals who have similar work backgrounds, I’ll have lifelong contacts to both seek advice and discuss teaching practices. I look forward to the prospect of bringing different projects to the Mount and sharing them not only with my students, but the community at large,” said Miller, who will present her first project at an AMATYC conference in 2015.

After previously working as an adjunct professor at four colleges, Miller began her first full-time faculty position at MWCC in 2012. She earned a bachelor’s degree in science and mathematics at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, and holds a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Vermont. She previously taught English for two years in Taiwan.

Les-Miz-mLet the Tony Award-winning musical triumph sweep you through an epic tale of passion and redemption in 19th century France when Mount Wachusett Community College’s Theatre at the Mount presents Les Miserables on October 10, 11, 17, 18 at 8 p.m. and October 12 and 19 at 2 p.m..

Featuring a cast of nearly 60 actors, ages 7 to 70, TAM’s production is directed by Peter Landry, with musical direction by Joanne Landry.

Les Miserables follows Jean Valjean as he is pursued by the implacable Inspector Javert through some of the most tumultuous years in French history. The original Broadway production was nominated for 12 Tony Awards and won eight, including Best Musical and Best Original Score. It is the world’s longest-running musical and has been seen by over 60 million people in 42 countries.

The magnificent score includes the unforgettable songs “I Dreamed a Dream,” “On My Own,” “Stars,” “Bring Him Home,” “Do You Hear the People Sing?” “One Day More,” “Empty Chairs at Empty Tables,” “Master of the House,” and many more.

The production features Taylor Lawton as Jean Valjean, Aaron Keyes as Javert, Becky Ufema as Fantine, Anna Plummer as Cosette, Jacqueline Savageau as Eponine, Michael Celularo and Joyce Baldwin as Monsieur and Madame Thenardier, and Lucas Arndt and Jonathan Dano as the revolutionaries Marius and Enjolras, respectively. Bradley Bartlett-Roche plays the fledgling revolutionary Gavroche and Bunny Baldwin plays Young Cosette.

Tickets for Les Miserables are $20 for evenings; $15 for matinees; and, $10 for students ages 16 and under. Call the Theatre at the Mount Box Office at 978-630-9388 or purchase tickets online at www.mwcc.edu/tam

Nursing Class of 2014

Members of the 2014 Nursing Class are among the state and region’s newest health care employees.

Mount Wachusett Community College, its students and alumni add more than $207 million in income each year to North Central Massachusetts and the Commonwealth, according to a newly released regional economic impact report.The study, prepared for the college by Economic Modeling Specialists, Inc., involved a regional economic impact analysis and an investment analysis during the 2012-2013 fiscal year. According to the findings, MWCC promotes economic growth in the 29 cities and towns that comprise its service area in a variety of ways. The college is one of the region’s largest employers, it is a buyer of goods and services, is a primary source of education to local residents, and supplies local industry with trained workers.MWCC creates a significant positive impact on the local business community and generates a return on investment to its major stakeholder groups – students, society and taxpayers. During the analysis year, income created by MWCC as a result of college operations equaled $37.8 million and income created as the result of student productivity equaled $169.8 million, for a total effect of $207.6 million.

“The role of community colleges as economic engines has long been recognized and this study provides updated data on the positive impact MWCC has in our region and the state,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “We enroll more than 12,000 credit and noncredit students each year, and the majority of our alumni remain in the region and in the state to contribute to the local economy.”

The return on investment to students, society and taxpayers is significant, the report found. Students paid a total of $16.2 million to cover the cost of tuition, fees, books and supplies during the analysis year. In return for their investment, students will receive a present value of $409.5 million in increased earnings over their working lives. This translates to a return of $6.30 in higher future income for every $1 that students invest in their education, for an average annual return for students of 25.4 percent.

Society as a whole in Massachusetts will receive a present value of $955.3 million in added state income over the course of the students’ working lives. Society will also benefit from $15.3 million in present value social savings related to reduced crime, lower unemployment and increased health and well-being across the state. For every dollar that society spent on MWCC educations during the analysis year, society will receive a cumulative value of $9.80 in benefits, for as long as MWCC’s 2012-13 students remain active in the state workforce.

From the taxpayer perspective, state taxpayers invested $16.3 million to support the operations of MWCC. The net present value of added tax revenue stemming from the students’ higher lifetime incomes and the increased output of business amounts to $78.6 million in benefits to taxpayers. Savings to the public sector add another $4.5 million in benefits due to the reduced demand for government-funded services in Massachusetts. By dividing benefits to taxpayers by the associated costs, the average annual return on investment for taxpayers is 13.2 percent, or $5.10 in benefits for every $1.

Other highlights include:

  • MWCC employed a total of 1,069 faculty and staff in FY2012-13. Payroll amounted to $32.7 million, much of which was spent in the MWCC service region to purchase groceries, clothing and other household goods and services. The college spent another $14.3 million to support its day-to-day operations.
  • The net impact of college payroll and expenses in the MWCC service region during the analysis year was approximately $37.8 million in added regional income.
  • Overall, the added income created by MWCC and its students supported 3,294 job equivalents in the region.

 

MWCC ice bucket challenge

President Daniel Asquino is doused by Executive Vice President Ann McDonald during MWCC’s ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in memory of colleague Glenn Roberts.

Twenty-four MWCC employees, including President Daniel M. Asquino, lined up for the ice bucket challenge in memory of beloved colleague Glenn Roberts, who died a year ago on Aug. 12, 2013 after a courageous battle with the disease. The effort, organized by Access & Transition Staff Assistant Jessica Connors on behalf of “Glenn’s Friends,” raised more than $2,600 for the Massachusetts chapter of the ALS Association in honor of Roberts, who worked as an advisor and dean at the college for 21 years.

One by one, participants were drenched by a friend, colleague or family member who bid highest for the opportunity to tip a bucket. After being soaked by her young son, Executive Vice President Ann McDonald had the privilege of dousing the president.

“I’m challenging the other community colleges to get involved and raise just as much for ALS,” President Asquino announced.

In addition to President Asquino, Executive Vice President McDonald and Connors, other volunteers included Vice President Bob LaBonte, Vice President Lea Ann Scales, Kerrie Griffin, Kyla Holland, Jo-Anne Cronin-Fors, Scott Farris, Julie Crowley, Sue Guartafierro, Eric Johnson, Charity Cooley, Kate Smith, John Walsh, Michele Levasseur Goderre, Jim Halkola, Peggy Dow, Brenda Bourgeois, Lawrence Nfor, Chrystal Voorheis, Denise Whitney, Maryann Kane and Lexie Stewart.

To view the video, click here.

Bionostics Floyd 2Mount Wachusett Community College has been awarded a $75,000 grant from the Community Foundation of North Central Massachusetts to support student scholarships. This grant comes from the Community Foundation’s General Endowment Education Access Fund, and will specifically support MWCC’s Career Focused Education Scholarship Program.

The scholarship partnership between MWCC and the Community Foundation will support students enrolled in Advanced Manufacturing, Biotechnology, or a credit certificate program for career improvement, such as Certified Nursing Assistant, Emergency Medical Technician programs, as well as newly established programs Analytical Laboratory and Quality Systems, Cyber Security and Hospitality.

To qualify, students must live in North Central Massachusetts, demonstrate financial need, and be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. Award amounts will vary.

“We are very grateful to the Community Foundation for this award to support students as they pursue their academic and career goals,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “The vast majority of our students remain in the area after graduating to live and work, so this funding ultimately helps strengthen our local communities as well as the economic vitality of our region.”

The grant was announced Aug. 8 by the Community Foundation, which awarded $293,000 to 23 organizations

The Community Foundation of North Central Massachusetts is a nonprofit, community, corporation created by and for the people of greater North Central Massachusetts. They help philanthropic donors make a positive impact on their community. The Community Foundation General Endowment Education Access Fund supports community development, environment, animal welfare, arts and culture, as well as health and human services.

UBMS 2014 student group

UBMS Director Angele Goss and State Rep. Jon Zlotnick are joined by this year’s Upward Bound Math and Science students during the program’s recent year-end celebration.

Dozens of area high school students from Gardner, Athol and Winchendon were recently recognized for their academic success in Mount Wachusett Community College’s Upward Bound Math and Science program, a federal TRIO program celebrating its 50th anniversary this year.

Sixty-three students participated in the program’s summer residential component, which included dual enrollment courses, extracurricular activities, career exploration and field trips and took place at Fitchburg State University.

State Rep. Jon Zlotnik of Gardner was the keynote speaker. Lea Ann Scales, MWCC Vice President of Access, Transition and Development delivered a welcome from the college. UBMS Director Angele Goss and program coordinator Ralph Hogan also congratulated the students on their success.

“The six-week residential UBMS program provides a great environment for students to grow academically, socially and culturally,” said Angele Goss Director of Upward Bound Math Science and the North Central Mass Talent Search program, both offered through MWCC’s Division of Access and Transition. “We build a small supportive community that allows student to take positive risks toward educational and personal development.”

The program is offered to students who have an aptitude for math and science and are in grades 9 through 12 at Gardner High School, Athol High School and Murdock Memorial Middle/Senior High School in Winchendon. Two thirds of the students are from low income or first-generation college families and have an identified need for services.

During the summer, students dual enrolment courses in biology, psychology and English and attended a leadership conference, career roundtable, a variety of recreational and educational, career building workshops. The also learned languages from Rosetta Stone, Spanish, Korean, Mandarin and Italian, participated in community service. Other summer highlights include trips to several colleges and universities, Boston, Mystic Seaport, a talent show and family fun night.

MWCC’s North Central Massachusetts Upward Bound Math and Science program began in 2008 with a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. In 2012, the college received a five-year, $1.3 million grant to continue funding the program. Now completing its seventh year at the college, the program prepares high school students from Gardner, Athol, and Winchendon for success in high school and college in the fields of math and science.

The primary goal of the program is to prepare high school students for postsecondary education programs that lead to careers in the fields of math and science. The program provides a comprehensive academic year, summer and bridge program during the-five year period that is customized to the needs of each participant. On Saturdays and school vacations during the academic year, students  participate in college tours, monthly science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)-based cultural/academic enrichment opportunities, hands-on laboratory activities; STEM-based field trip, lectures and other activities.

The students also receive individual success plan development and follow-up meetings with academic counselors and program aides, secondary school course selection advising, after-school tutoring, guidance and assistance, alternative education programs, parent/guardian workshops, e-mentoring and workshops.

Freshmen and sophomores have access to state-mandated test preparation and a career fair and roundtable, while juniors and seniors have access to dual enrollment courses, SAT and ACT preparation, Accuplacer preparation, a college fair, college admission assistance, financial aid assistance, and postsecondary course selection advising during the academic year.