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Liane Jablonski and Robin Robinson COD award 2014

Massachusetts Colleges Online Course of Distinction Award recipient Liane Jablonski, left, with MCO chair Robin Robinson, Director of Education Technology and Interactive Media at Framingham State University.

MWCC instructor Liane Jablonski was recently recognized with a Course of Distinction Award from Massachusetts Colleges Online for her online course, “Introduction to Sociology.”

A resident of Rindge, N.H., Jablonski received the award during the consortium’s 10th annual eLearning Conference, held this spring at Bridgewater State University.

More than 2,600 courses are offered through MCO, a consortium of the 15 community colleges and seven members of the state university system in Massachusetts. The MCO Course of Distinction (COD) award is named after the Bay State’s unique association with the “Sacred Cod,” and the contributions that the fishing industry made to Massachusetts economy in the early years of its history.

“The award recognizes faculty from throughout the state who have developed and teach innovative and exciting online courses,” said Dr. Vincent Ialenti, dean of Academic and Institutional Technology at MWCC. “These courses are representative of the best uses of eLearning instructional tools to enhance student success.” The award’s name was selected to recognize the contribution that MCO’s members and eLearning make to the state’s economy in the 21st century.

In addition to accepting a cod fish replica pitcher and certificate at a special luncheon at the conference, Jablonski presented information about her course as part of the conference’s Best Practices Showcase.

MWCC Assistant Dean of Curriculum and Instruction Michele Paranto described Jablonski’s course as “Exemplary in its use of the learning modules to scaffold and facilitate student learning and engage students in the course material.”

In her course, Jablonski built discussion boards that encourage students to take ownership of their learning, to communicate and collaborate with each other and to master the content. In addition, she maximizes course communication to create and maintain a consistent instructor presence within the course that fostered positive online relationships with students, Paranti said.

Jay Bhatt, president and chief executive officer of Blackboard, Inc. delivered a keynote address to the 250 conference attendees, focusing on the role of online and classroom technology in education’s future, the impact on teaching and learning, and the expectations of 21st century learners.

 

2014 relay tv

President Daniel Asquino and other members of MWCC’s Relay for Life team were among the 2,155 participants in the 24-hour walk to raise funds for the American Cancer Society in support of research.

Mount Wachusett Community College students, staff and faculty were among the 2,155 participants who walked to raise funds for the American Cancer Society in this year’s Greater Gardner Relay for Life.

The 159 teams raised more than $444,000 during the 21st annual relay, held June 13 and 14 at MWCC’s fitness track. Participants and survivors walked to support loved ones battling cancer and in remembrance of loved ones who have passed.

MWCC’s relay team, chaired by Vice President of Finance and Administration Bob Labonte, Professor Susan Goldstein, and campus police Lt. Melissa Crouteau, received overwhelming support from students to walk the entire 24 hours.

LaBonte thanked the college community for supporting MWCC’s team, including Theatre Technical Director and Set designer Jeffrey Boisseau, who created the team’s giant television booth in keeping with the event’s television theme this year.

The MWCC Alumni Association also hosted a team.

“Every member of the Alumni Association Relay Team has experienced firsthand how cancer affects our friends and loved ones. On our team we had at least one cancer survivor and others who have been caregivers and all of us have known someone who has fought and won, or fought and lost, a battle with cancer,” said Mark Geoffroy, vice president of the MWCC Alumni Association. “I’m so glad that Mount alumni were able to come together for this great cause.”

Over the past two decades, the event has raised over $12 million making it one of the most successful relays in the country.

-          Alexander P. Moore

 

 

Congressman Jim McGovern

Congressman Jim McGovern

With more than 50 million Americans living in poverty, including nearly 27,000 residents of North Central Massachusetts, the 50-year War on Poverty remains a critical national and local issue.

On June 13, more than 250 local and state leaders, students, educators and community members gathered in Leominster for the symposium “Poverty at Home/Reasons for Hope.” The event, sponsored by the Montachusett Opportunity Council in partnership with Mount Wachusett Community College, Fitchburg State University and the North Central Massachusetts Minority Coalition, commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Economic Opportunity Act and the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Guest speakers included Congressman Jim McGovern and Ronald G. Marlow, Massachusetts Assistant Secretary for Access and Opportunity. Panelists and participants discussed current economic trends in the region, explored the causes of poverty, and provided inspiration to change the patterns that lead to poverty.

In North Central Massachusetts, 26,889 people are living in poverty and an additional 35,204 people are classified as “low income,” according to information provided by MOC.

Presenters emphasized that overcoming poverty in the region, state and nationally will require a concerted effort among public agencies, elected officials, nonprofit organizations, academic institutions and the private sector.

MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino, who served on the panel “Creating Hopeful Communities,” spoke on the importance of education in lifting families out of poverty, beginning with early childhood education, a strong foundation in K-12 schools and higher education.

President Asquino emphasized the national need for a paradigm shift in how education is viewed. Instead of being treated as a private benefit for individuals, education should be recognized for the public benefits it provides. Access to higher education should be an opportunity for all.

“We need to get back to treating education as an investment, and not an expense,” he said.

VFW scholarship donation to MWCC Foundation

Members of Ovila Case Post 905 Veterans of Foreign Wars recently presented a $1,000 donation to the Mount Wachusett Community College Foundation to support scholarships for student veterans. Pictured, from left, Commander Howard Sands, President Daniel M. Asquino, Service Commander Kenneth Fournier, board member and past commander Don Progen, and MWCC Foundation Executive Director Carla DeFosse.

The Ovila Case Post 905 Veterans of Foreign Wars in Gardner recently donated $1,000 to Mount Wachusett Community College Foundation’s Veterans Memorial Scholarship.

President Daniel M. Asquino and Foundation Executive Director Carla DeFosse accepted the generous donation from VFW Commander Howard Sands, Service Commander Kenneth Fournier and board member and past commander Don Progen, and thanked the post members for their continued support of MWCC and student veterans.

The scholarship was established to recognize the important role played by MWCC in ensuring that the sacrifices and service of veterans who served the country will not be forgotten.

Scholarship funds are awarded to new or returning full-time students who were honorably discharged from the U.S. Armed Forces or are currently serving in the Reserves or National Guard.

2014 Gateway and Pathways graduates

2014 Gateway and Pathways graduates

From the age-old wisdom of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe to the reflections of teenagers wise beyond years, the May 27 graduation ceremony honoring 48 dual enrollment students at Mount Wachusett Community College offered a blend of insight and inspiration.

Students enrolled in the Gateway to College program and the Pathways Early College Innovation School, offered in partnership with the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School District, were lauded for their accomplishments by educators, family members and friends gathered in the college’s Raymond M. LaFontaine Fine Arts Center theatre. As dual enrollment students, the graduates all completed the requirements for their high school diploma while simultaneously earning college credits or an associate degree.

“As I reflect on your accomplishments, one thing comes to mind and that is that you are going to be successful, for a variety of reasons, but one in particular. You have taken a different path to graduation. You decided to be nontraditional, you decided to think outside the box and be creative. All of these skills are going to be beneficial to you,” MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino told the graduates.

“Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it,” he said, quoting van Goethe. Determining one’s calling, the president continued, can be difficult in the face of many changes, compromises, demands of time and the constant interruptions of living in a fast-paced world. “So dream,” he said. “Set aside some time for deep reflection and insight.”

Mahar Superintendent of Schools Tari N. Thomas praised the graduates for their strength and tenacity, otherwise known as grit.

“Grit is defined as sticking with things over the long term until you master them,” she said. “Research shows when it comes to achievement, grit is determined to be as essential as intellect. Research is now showing our grittiest students, the ones who are working hard with the greatest amount of determination, are the ones realizing the greatest success and even the greatest GPAs. All of you are unique and strong. You’ve demonstrated the grit necessary for high achievement, scholarly success and more. You’re hard working, tenacious and diligent and it will pay off.”

Gateway valedictorian Zoe Greim shared her personal story of adversity and triumph. Diagnosed in high school with Multiple Sclerosis, she viewed the news as a “wake-up call” to take charge of her life and not waste a minute of time. Disenchanted with the high schools she attended, she enrolled in the Gateway to College program at the advice of a guidance counselor and was named to the dean’s list or president’s list during all three semesters at the college. This fall, she will transfer to a university in Florida to pursue a bachelor’s degree.

“We need to see life is too short to sit around and wait for good or bad things to come to us. We need to go out and make things happen. I know we can all do that, since we all made the decision to come here. We need to strive to be the best we can be. If you want something, go get it and don’t let anyone or anything stand in your way,” Greim told her fellow graduates.

Pathways valedictorian Erin Leamy reflected on the diverse paths each student took to reach their graduation day, as well as the common traits they all share.

“We all had something in common that inspired us to leave high school early and get a jump start on college. For some, it was simply time to move on. We no longer felt academically challenged. For others, high school had become stale, and we were looking for a fresh start. I can’t help but wonder how many diverse paths each of our lives will take – how many ways we’ll be challenged, and how each of us will respond to those challenges.”

Joseph Benavidez , who graduated in 2009 from the Gateway program and earned an associate degree in Liberal Arts from MWCC in 2010, was the keynote speaker. After graduating from MWCC, he transferred to Salem State University and earned a bachelor’s degree in communications in 2013 and is now working as a journalist.

“Tonight, you are all warriors after a battle. You’ve earned your high school diploma. Some of you have already received college degrees as well. It took sweat and hardship to get here and that deserves a round of applause.”

Deborah Bibeau, assistant dean of transitions programming at MWCC, praised the partnership between the college and the school district. “As a testament to the long-term collaboration with the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School District, this summer we’ll be preparing for the new Pathways students entering the program’s fifth year of operation, and new Gateway students entering the program’s ninth year of operation.”

Mount Wachusett Community College graduates

Graduates Lindsey Arnold and Kathleen Craigen.

In a Commencement address peppered with accolades and advice, University of Massachusetts, Lowell Chancellor Marty Meehan praised the graduating Class of 2014 for their achievements and offered words of wisdom as they begin a new chapter in their lives.

Mount Wachusett graduates receive “a better education” than most college and university graduates, Meehan said, because in addition to mastering their academic subjects and overcoming challenges, they learned how to be great human beings through the college-wide emphasis on civic engagement.

“You have unprecedented means to engage with your communities, and indeed the world,” he said during the college’s 49th Commencement on May 21. This year, MWCC awarded 857 associate degrees and certificates to 786 graduates.

A first-generation college student, Meehan earned his bachelor’s degree at UMass Lowell while working full-time as a janitor, then went on to graduate school and served seven terms in Congress before becoming chancellor of his alma mater.

“Some of you are the first ones in your families to get a college degree. Some of you are new immigrants that have come to the United States. Some of you got married earlier and raised families and have come back to college to earn your degree. But all of your collective experiences have made you stronger, and I want you to know there is nothing you can’t accomplish if you set your mind to it.”

Meehan concluded his address with key tips for the graduates, urging them to be great listeners; commit themselves to lifelong learning to keep pace with a rapidly changing world; to never compromise their integrity; to follow their passion; and be humble and always remember their roots.

President Daniel M. Asquino commended the graduates for their ongoing commitment to improving the world around them through education and service, noting this past academic year, MWCC students collectively devoted more than 144,000 hours of service learning and volunteerism to their communities.

“My wish for you is that you use your education to continue these pursuits and to improve your life, that of you family and friends, and that of your community, state and your nation and that you manifest an overall behavior that enlarges your circle of good,” he said.

Chevenee Reavis and President Daniel Asquino

Alumna of the Year Chevenee Reavis and President Asquino on Commencement day.

Alumna of the Year Chevenee Reavis reflected on her memories while a student at the college and shared experiences about her career path since graduating in 2000 with an associate degree in Business Administration.

“What I remember most about being here at the Mount was learning about myself and what I had in terms of character and in terms of conviction.”

Reavis, who began her studies as a dual enrollment student and transferred to Emerson College for a bachelor’s degree in marketing and communications, now serves as director of strategic initiatives for the global organization Water.org, raising awareness about the water crisis affecting 2.5 billion people worldwide.

The nonprofit, co-founded by CEO Gary White and actor Matt Damon, has transformed thousands of communities in Africa, South Asia and Central America by providing access to safe water and sanitation to more than one million people.

“We have an enormous mission and vision and that is to see the day when everyone in the world has access to safe drinking water and the dignity of a toilet,” she said to a round of applause. “It does sound so basic, and yet I think many of you here know it is unfortunately not the reality for everyone around the world. We’re not waiting for a cure. We’re not waiting for a scientific breakthrough. We know the cure – it’s engineering. We’ve known how to deliver safe water and adequate sanitation for hundreds of years.”

At MWCC, Reavis said, she learned what this year’s graduates are also learning – that they can create their own path in life.

“Whatever step this is for you, whether you’re going to another school, or this is a stepping stone in a job, or a personal goal, be really proud of yourselves.”

Jillian Johnson was presented with the Trustees Award for her service this year on the MWCC Board of Trustees. The President’s Key Award for academic excellence was presented to Natural Resources major Seth Pease and Business Administration major Nina Margand. Kathleen Matson and Bryan Sanderson were presented with the Dean’s Key, which is awarded for outstanding community service. Emerita status was presented to Biology Professor Christine Kisiel.

The 2014 Service above Self Award was presented to Attorney Charles A. Gelinas, Sr., for his ongoing leadership on many North Central Massachusetts initiatives.

For more photos, click here to visit MWCC’s Facebook page.

Nursing Class of 2014

MWCC’s Associate Degree Nursing Class of 2014.

The academic achievements of MWCC’s 41st associate degree nursing graduating class were celebrated during a traditional pinning ceremony held May 22 in the Fitness and Wellness Center.

The graduating class was comprised of students enrolled in the day and evening programs and included LPN’s who returned to continue their education through the college’s new Bridge to Nursing program.

MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino congratulated the students on their success completing one of the college’s most rigorous academic programs. He noted that the care and compassion of nurses bring tremendous comfort to patients who are often at their lowest moment and in pain. “You truly can make a difference in their healing and their lives.”

Eileen Costello, dean of the School of Health Sciences and Community Service Programs, also welcomed the graduates and their families. Cindy Andrews, Director of Nursing and Assistant Vice President of Seven Hills Pediatric Center, delivered the keynote address. As part of their clinical experience, the students receive training at Seven Hills, and many are hired by the long-term care center for children with severe disabilities. Three employees of the center were among the graduates.

“Mount Wachusett nurses have just been a godsend to us,” she said. “They are so well trained.” Andrews encouraged the graduates to continue on with their education and always advocate for their patients. “They’re relying on you to be their voice.”

Dressed in traditional nurse uniforms, the students were welcomed into the profession by having the program’s nursing pin fastened to their lapels by a family member, friend, or an alumnus of the program, or a faculty member, to the cheers of family and friends. The pin symbolizes where the nurses completed their studies to become an RN and distinguishes them from other health care professionals. The eight-star MWCC pin is imprinted with the words “Service to Humanity and the World.”

As part of the ceremony, the students also took a nursing pledge that dates back to Florence Nightingale, who distinguished herself during the Crimean War by coming to the aid of sick and woundedsoldiers.

Dental Hygiene pinning 2014 awards

Dental Programs Director Anne Malkasian with this year’s award recipients Whitney Fox, Jennifer LePage, Brigitte Wong, and Bonnie Buckingham-Stone.

Graduates of MWCC’s Dental Hygiene and Dental Assisting programs were welcomed into the profession during the department’s annual pinning ceremony on May 16 in the Raymond M. Lafontaine Fine Arts Center theatre.

Dr. Melissa Fama, vice president of Academic Affairs, and Anne Malkasian, program director, congratulated the graduates on their achievement.

“Nelson Mandela once said, ‘There is no passion to be found in playing small, in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living.’  I hope that you will not see today as an end to your education but a beginning. I hope that you will embrace lifelong learning and advance yourself to your highest potential,” Malkasian told the graduates.

“We are reminded daily and most recently in the media, of the injustices in the world, in Nigeria especially, where more than 300 young girls have been abducted simply because they are pursing education,” she continued. “Let this act be a reminder to us all, how precious our liberty is, to follow our dreams in this great country, this state and in this institution – of Mount Wachusett Community College.”

Malkasian, who is retiring this summer after years of expanding the successful program, was recognized by the students and faculty for her dedication and leadership.

Government Affairs consultant Charles Glick, who met the students during their annual visit to the State House to advocate for legislative changes in the dental profession, was the keynote speaker. As government affairs consultant to American Dental Hygiene Association Massachusetts, Glick serves as a “cheerleader” of sorts for the dental hygiene profession and coach to legislators on the impact of regulations, he said.

“I have learned so much over the course of the last few years. I am now able to do root planing and scaling. Just kidding! Seriously, I have learned that dental hygienists and dental assistants are educators. You educate people in the prevention of a disease that is fully preventable.  You aren’t just putting sharp instruments into people mouths, though you are well qualified to do that, you are treating the whole person. You are health coaches encouraging people to do the things they need to do when they go home. You are clinicians, educators, advocates, managers and researchers, in order to prevent oral disease and promote health.”

Congressman Jim McGovern

Congressman Jim McGovern will be among the symposium’s keynote speakers.

In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Economic Opportunity Act and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Montachusett Opportunity Council, Inc., in partnership with Mount Wachusett Community College, Fitchburg State University and the Minority Coalition will host the “Poverty at Home/Reasons for Hope” symposium on June 13 from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.  at the DoubleTree in Leominster.

The event will focus on current economic trends and causes of poverty in the region and provide inspiration to change the patterns that lead to poverty.

The North Central region is home to 26,889 people living in poverty and another 35,204 individuals who are classified as “low income” or living between 100% and 200% of the federal poverty guidelines.

“As concerned citizens of the North Central region, it is important that we come together to discuss the causes and effects of poverty and to take action toward the goal of reducing and eventually eliminating poverty in our community.” said Kathleen McDermott, Executive Director of the Montachusett Opportunity Council, Inc.

Sponsors of the event have assembled a cross section of practitioners, economists, researchers, policymakers and others for a discussion on how poverty impacts our community and innovative strategies for ending it. Featured keynote speakers include Congressman James McGovern, 2nd Congressional District and Ronald G. Marlow, Assistant Secretary for Access and Opportunity, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  The luncheon keynote address will be given by Pulitzer Prize winning investigative reporter, Andrea Elliott of The New York Times.  Ms. Elliott will highlight the living conditions of those living in poverty and how policy can have an impact on improving the lives of those impacted.

“It is heartening to see such a broad spectrum of community leaders, policy makers, educators and other committed partners gather to address the causes of poverty that persist in our country and in our region,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino, who will be among the panelists.

“I am particularly encouraged by the mix of enthusiasm and expertise that participants are bringing to the table to collectively address the needs and solutions in our North Central Massachusetts community.”

The first panel session, “Where We Are: Faces of Poverty,” will include Noah Berger, President, Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center; Kathleen J. McDermott, Executive Director, Montachusett Opportunity Council; and Janet Boguslaw, Research Scientist/Senior Lecturer/Associate Director of the Institute on Assets and Social Policy at Brandeis University. Topics of this panel will include: income inequality, minimum wage, local/state poverty statistics and health status indicators, health disparities and the role of public policy.

A second panel session, “Creating Hopeful Communities” will examine innovative methods of addressing poverty and highlight some examples such as collective impact models, neighborhood revitalization, education/job readiness, housing and homelessness and community development.  Moderated by Tamar Kotelchuck, Director, Working Cities Initiatives, Regional & Community Outreach Department, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, panelists will include Aaron Gornstein, Undersecretary, Department of Housing and Community Development; Dr. Daniel M. Asquino, President, Mount Wachusett Community College; Ascala T. Sisk, Director, Stabilization Initiative, Neighborworks America;  and Emily Gorin Malenfant, Director, Foundation Strategy Group.

During the luncheon, the Reasons for Hope award will be presented to Ronald M. Ansin for his exemplary contributions to the community to improve the conditions of those living in poverty.

Tickets to the event are $36. To register, contact the Montachusett Opportunity Council at 978-345-7040, ext. 14.

 

 

2014 MWCC Eve of Excellence Honors Program

Honors Program Coordinator Professor Sheila Murphy, left, with 2014 Honors Program graduates Sara Halloran, Tiffianie LeBlanc Nicole Pippert, Amanda Woods, Heather Rick, Sara Dwelly, Lourdes Abreu, Seth Pease and Jessie Bigwood. Not pictured, Kyna Bell, Cory Berndt, Lisa Ray.

Mount Wachusett Community College celebrated the academic accomplishments of extraordinary students at the annual Evening of Excellence awards dinner May 15 at the Doubletree Inn, Leominster. The students were honored with prestigious awards not only for their performance inside of the classroom, but for their contributions in the community as well.

In addition to curriculum awards and other recognitions, the MWCC Foundation presented a number of awards during the ceremony. The foundation has awarded $260,000 in scholarships during the 2013-2014 academic year.

To view photos, click here.

The following awards were presented:

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

All USA Academic Team Nominees: Bryan Sanderson and Kathleen Craigen

Visions Program Award: Monica Medeiros

RX Award: Tasey Chartier

Best of English 101: Asia Traffie, Leah Trudeau and John Mossey

Sandy Signor Award: Heidi Lupien of Gardner

Jean Tandy Award: Dylan Safford

2014 Newman Civic Fellow Award: Kathleen Matson

Service Learning Scholarship: Roxanna Figueroa and Bryan Nolan

 

CURRICULUM AWARDS

Art: Thomas Hill and Melissa Agin

Automotive Technology: Benjamin Brookman

Biotechnology/Biomanufacturing: Laura Calix

Broadcasting and Electronic Media: Tiffianie LeBlanc

Broadcasting and Electronic Media – Photography Option: Samantha Skinner

Business Administration Career: Nina Margand

Business Administration Transfer: Carly Mongeau

Clinical Laboratory Science: Casey Gallant

Complementary Health Care: Paul Campbell

Computer Graphic Design: Jennie Laronga

Computer Graphic Design – Web Concentration: Sara Dwelly

Computer Information Systems: Kendra Killian

Criminal Justice: Elizabeth Reiser

Dental Hygiene: Lauren Phillips

Early Childhood Education Career: Paula Rocheleau

Early Childhood Education Transfer: Rachael O’Neil

Fire Science: Zechariah Matson

General Studies: Amanda Woods

Human Services: Bryan Sanderson

Liberal Arts & Sciences: Erin Leamy

LPN to ADN Bridge: Cory Berndt

Medical Assisting: Kelsey Toomey

Natural Resources Technology: Seth Pease and Angela Wyman

Nursing: Lani Cabral and Krista Shell

Paralegal: Heather Rick

Physical Therapy Assistant: Alissa Zbikowski

 

MWCC FOUNDATION, INC. AWARDS

Alumni Scholarship: Linda Patterson

Barbara Chaplin Memorial Scholarship: Caroline Flagg

Barnes & Noble Scholarship:  Rachel Kalagher, Briana Cullins and Sarah Croce

Carl Tammi Award: Bryan Nolan

Carrie Progen Memorial Scholarship: Leandro Lopez

Craig Hamel Scholarship: Pranee Terry

Edith Baldyga Scholarship: Caroline Flagg

Ellen Daly Dental Hygiene Scholarship: Tasey Chartier

James D. Murphy Scholarship: Jillian Johnson

Jonathan C. Craven Scholarship: Amanda Gorrell

John Burton Award: Shane Williams and Melissa Agin

Joseph B. Ruth Scholarship: Eveliz Rivera-White

Joseph S. Baldyga Veteran’s Fund: Michael Feeley

H. Marilyn Kiosses Scholarship: Katelynn O’Brien

Melissa Herr Marsh Scholarship: Jessica Johnson

Michael & Christine Greenwood Business Scholarship: Marissa Lacruz

Millie McGuire Foundation: Sandra Bushey

Mount Observer Scholarship: Tiffianie LeBlanc

Nashoba Valley Healthcare Fund: Jane Crowley and Julie Sullivan

Robert Weibel Scholarship: Jennifer Potvin

Robert H. Gilman Memorial Scholarship: Suellen Dias

Roberts Scholarship: Micaiah Bushnell

Sara Kajel Award: Lindsay Howard

Sharyn Rice Scholarship: Moises Ramos

MWCC Veteran’s Memorial Scholarship: Bryan Sanderson

 

MEMORIAL AWARDS

Aspasia Anastos Award: Yamileyka Rojas

Judge Moore Award: Seth Pease and Heather Rick

Peter J. Trainor Leadership Award: John Day

 

HONORS SOCIETY RECOGNITION

Alpha Beta Scholarship: Mary Burns and Kathleen Matson

Honors Program: Lourdes Abreu; Heather Rick; Nicole Pippert; Amanda Woods; Cory Berndt; Tiffianie LeBlanc; Seth Pease; Jessie Bigwood; Sara Dwelly; Sara Holloran; and Lisa Ray