Student Stories

Yasmin Barroso, Jasson Alvarado, Anne Nash, and Mariah Courtemanche

Back-to-school activities included the 10th annual Summer Leadership Camp held in late August. Fifty incoming students participated in a variety of workshops and community service projects, including filling 77 backpacks of donated school supplies for Massachusetts children in foster care. Additional service projects took place at the Cleghorn Neighborhood Center in Fitchburg and Many Hands organic farm in Barre. Pictured, from left, Yasmin Barroso, Jasson Alvarado Gomez, Anne Nash and Mariah Courtemanche.

Many changes and new initiatives marked the start of the 2014-2015 academic year. Not only are the college’s campuses filled with thousands of new and returning students, but several faculty and staff members have joined the college community or stepped into new roles.

Approximately 950 new students participated in day, evening and program-specific orientations, marking a dynamic start to the academic year. The orientation sessions provide students with an opportunity to learn about college life and MWCC programs, support services, and activities.

A majority of the new day students attended orientation on Sept.2, which included seminars and other activities. Students met with faculty, deans and advisors, toured the campus, received information about college resources, and attended a student club expo. President Daniel M. Asquino and college administrators greeted the incoming students and encouraged them to become involved with campus activities and tap into college resources to make the most of their experience at MWCC.

Campus changes include several changes in the Division of Academic Affairs. Dr. Vincent Ialenti is serving the Interim Dean of Liberal Arts, Education, Humanities, and Communication through the academic year, and Missi Sargent has been appointed Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Veronica Guay, former Director of Dual Enrollment, has taken the position of Assistant Dean of the School of Business, Science, Technology and Math. Staff Associate Cheryl Oliveri has moved to the Office of Development, Planning and Research and Michelle Brennan has been appointed staff associate for the Division of Academic Affairs.

In the area of Student Services, long-serving adjunct instructor and Army veteran Bob Mayer steps into a new role as Director of Veteran Services, and will oversee MWCC’s Center of Excellence for Veteran Student Success.

Among the faculty changes, Cynthia Cadoret has been appointed assistant professor and chair of the dental hygiene and dental assisting programs, and Lisa Gendron has been appointed assistant professor in the associate degree nursing program. In addition, Maryjo Bowie was appointed professor and chair of the new Health Information Management program.

In the Division of Lifelong Learning and Workforce Development, Michael Watson was appointed an instructor with the Manufacturing and Quality Systems program, and Gretchen Ingvason was appointed senior learning specialist. In addition, Timothy Friend joined the MWCC Campus Police department as an officer.

 

 

 

Thoreau quote sign

Along the trails at Walden Pond in Concord.

This month, Mount Wachusett Community College launches “East Meets West in a Cabin in Concord: Walden and Beyond,” the first year of a multi-year, college and community project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The MWCC Humanities Project will begin with a book discussion on Walden, or Life in the Woods by Henry David Thoreau, famed Massachusetts author and the focus of this year’s initiative. Led by MWCC English Professors Michelle Valois and Susan Blake, the discussion will take place Wednesday, Sept. 17 from 6:30 to 8p.m. in the Commons Area of the college’s Gardner campus and is the first in a full slate of free events taking place this fall at venues throughout North Central Massachusetts.

Other upcoming events include a fundraising hike at Wachusett Mountain, a performance by a Thoreau re-enactor, and additional lectures and book discussions on the lasting relevance of Thoreau. Established through a $500,000 challenge grant the college received from the NEH,  the project will continue through 2019 with a new theme each academic year.

In late May, 30 MWCC educators spent a day walking the trails at Walden Pond in Concord, where Thoreau lived in a cabin for two years writing Walden, one of his most famous works. The visit was part of a week-long academy to prepare for the multi-disciplinary learning project devoted to the author’s influence and relevance to today’s students.

“Thoreau considered himself as much a scientist as a poet,” said Professor Valois, chair of the college’s Liberal Arts and Sciences and General Studies department and coordinator of the NEH project. “Thoreau’s scientific observations and inquiries are still relevant today and have given rise to the ‘citizen science’ movement. And as the creator of the modern concept of civil disobedience, Thoreau provides a perfect vehicle for examining the power and responsibility of the individual citizen in a healthy democracy.”

The program will continue with: “What Thoreau Can Teach Us about Climate Change,” a lecture led by Susan Gallagher of the University of Massachusetts, Lowell on Wednesday, Oct. 1 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Levi Heywood Memorial Library in Gardner; a screening of the film Into the Wild on Tuesday, Oct. 7 from 12:30 to 2:45 p.m. in Room 127 of MWCC Gardner campus; “Thoreau’s Relevance for Our Time,” a lecture led by writer and independent Thoreau scholar Corinne Smith, on Thursday, Oct. 9 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the North Cafeteria at the Gardner campus; A Hike for the Humanities matching grant fundraiser on Saturday, Oct. 18 at 9 a.m., reenacting Thoreau’s 1842 hike at Wachusett Mountain; a book discussion of Tom Montgomery Fate’s Cabin Fever: A Suburban Father’s Search for the Wild on Tuesday, Oct. 28 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Athol Public Library; and a performance by Thoreau re-enactor Richard Smith of the Thoreau Society on Thursday, Oct. 30 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the theater at MWCC’s Gardner campus.

Fall events will continue with a book discussion of Ken Ilgunas’Walden on Wheels: On the Open Road from Debt to Freedom on Nov. 6 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Leominster Public Library; a lecture on “Thoreau: Eastern Philosophy and Non-Violence,” by Michael Frederick, Executive Director of the Thoreau Society, on Tuesday, Nov. 18 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the North Cafeteria at the Gardner campus; and an exhibit with student presentations on Thursday, Dec. 4 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., also at the Gardner campus.

Spring activities will include additional book discussions and a poetry reading. For more information about the program and upcoming events, visit http://mwcc.edu/humanitiesproject.

Johnny Appleseed bench project

President Daniel Asquino and Art Professor Tom Matsuda pose in the East Wing Gallery with art students who participated in the Johnny Appleseed Country project. Seated: Jenifer Porcine, Corinne Goodrich and Michelle Gangnon; Back row: Tom Hill, President Asquino, Ben Mikels, Leandro Lopez and Professor Matsuda.

“Take a Seat in Johnny Appleseed Country” is a community project aimed at increasing foot traffic in the cities and towns that make up North Central Massachusetts. The Johnny Appleseed Trail Association met with the Wachusett Mountain Ski Resort and rather than throw away inoperative ski lift chairs, both organizations decided to use them as a promotional opportunity.

Six chairs were delivered to Montachusett Regional Technical School where they were refurbished and converted by students into functional benches. Then, they were delivered to Mount Wachusett Community College this summer, where they were painted by art students. MWCC Professor Tom Matsuda, chair of the art department, said he the students were excited to participate.  The chairs will be distributed in the region this fall.

Corinne Goodrich, a student involved with the project, said painting the bench was a challenge she enjoyed. “I think the project is honoring someone who was a remarkable person.”

Art student Tom Hill said he is new to creating art that will be seen by the public. “It’s been pretty fun. I don’t think I’ve ever done a project quite like this.” Student Ben Mikles said he likes any reason to have to create art. Any art created for the public is nice because it gets the artist’s name out in the open, he said.

“People like public art and this is really functional public art that can be sat on,” said Matt Myers, marketing and communications specialist for the Johnny Appleseed Trail Association. “As art students, one of the best things to do is get your work out there,” he said. ”All the students will have there names on the back of the chairs that they designed.”

Myers wanted the students to have their own individual style on the chairs, so he left the theme open for interpretation.

“The only guidelines given to the artists was to make it something relatable to North Central Massachusetts, whether that means a Johnny Appleseed themed bench or one that serves to represent the four seasons that are such a major part of life in the northeast,” Myers said. “I wanted to keep a general theme, that way the artists imagination would be given an opening to really express who they are and their connection to the area.”

From Wachusett Mountain, which has been a staple in the area for over 50 years, to students at Monty Tech and MWCC, the  Take a Seat in Johnny Appleseed Country project incorporates layers of community involvement to create ”something special,” Myers said.

- Alexander P. Moore

 

UBMS 2014 student group

UBMS Director Angele Goss and State Rep. Jon Zlotnick are joined by this year’s Upward Bound Math and Science students during the program’s recent year-end celebration.

Dozens of area high school students from Gardner, Athol and Winchendon were recently recognized for their academic success in Mount Wachusett Community College’s Upward Bound Math and Science program, a federal TRIO program celebrating its 50th anniversary this year.

Sixty-three students participated in the program’s summer residential component, which included dual enrollment courses, extracurricular activities, career exploration and field trips and took place at Fitchburg State University.

State Rep. Jon Zlotnik of Gardner was the keynote speaker. Lea Ann Scales, MWCC Vice President of Access, Transition and Development delivered a welcome from the college. UBMS Director Angele Goss and program coordinator Ralph Hogan also congratulated the students on their success.

“The six-week residential UBMS program provides a great environment for students to grow academically, socially and culturally,” said Angele Goss Director of Upward Bound Math Science and the North Central Mass Talent Search program, both offered through MWCC’s Division of Access and Transition. “We build a small supportive community that allows student to take positive risks toward educational and personal development.”

The program is offered to students who have an aptitude for math and science and are in grades 9 through 12 at Gardner High School, Athol High School and Murdock Memorial Middle/Senior High School in Winchendon. Two thirds of the students are from low income or first-generation college families and have an identified need for services.

During the summer, students dual enrolment courses in biology, psychology and English and attended a leadership conference, career roundtable, a variety of recreational and educational, career building workshops. The also learned languages from Rosetta Stone, Spanish, Korean, Mandarin and Italian, participated in community service. Other summer highlights include trips to several colleges and universities, Boston, Mystic Seaport, a talent show and family fun night.

MWCC’s North Central Massachusetts Upward Bound Math and Science program began in 2008 with a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. In 2012, the college received a five-year, $1.3 million grant to continue funding the program. Now completing its seventh year at the college, the program prepares high school students from Gardner, Athol, and Winchendon for success in high school and college in the fields of math and science.

The primary goal of the program is to prepare high school students for postsecondary education programs that lead to careers in the fields of math and science. The program provides a comprehensive academic year, summer and bridge program during the-five year period that is customized to the needs of each participant. On Saturdays and school vacations during the academic year, students  participate in college tours, monthly science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)-based cultural/academic enrichment opportunities, hands-on laboratory activities; STEM-based field trip, lectures and other activities.

The students also receive individual success plan development and follow-up meetings with academic counselors and program aides, secondary school course selection advising, after-school tutoring, guidance and assistance, alternative education programs, parent/guardian workshops, e-mentoring and workshops.

Freshmen and sophomores have access to state-mandated test preparation and a career fair and roundtable, while juniors and seniors have access to dual enrollment courses, SAT and ACT preparation, Accuplacer preparation, a college fair, college admission assistance, financial aid assistance, and postsecondary course selection advising during the academic year.

 

 

Summer UP 2014 Gardner

MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino, Gardner Mayor Mark Hawke and Gardner Superintendent Denise Clemens are thanked by members of MWCC’s Access & Transition staff, camp counselors and participants at the Jackson Playground site.

Summer UP, an MWCC Access & Transition program that began a decade ago to provide safe, summertime activities and employment opportunities to area youth, enhanced this year’s program with new career and college preparation training opportunities.

Now completing its 10th season, Summer UP this year provided 110 of area high school and middle school students with jobs as camp counselors at eight park sites in Leominster, Fitchburg, and Gardner. The counselors, who earn a stipend, worked with MWCC staff to provide supervised recreation activities for approximately 500 area school children of all ages, who attend the free activities.

“We’ve made a lot of modifications this year,” said Patrice Lincoln, Dean of Access and Transition. Among the changes for the program’s counselors, high school juniors and seniors enrolled in free summer dual enrollment courses, and the Commonwealth Corps’ 20-hour Signaling Success employment training program is now incorporated into the counselor training, along with park safety training, college preparation opportunities, and field trips.

Visitors during the five week program included Gardner Mayor Mark Hawke and Gardner’s new Superintendent of Schools Denise Clemens at the Jackson Park site, as well as town and school officials in Leominster.

In operation since the summer of 2005, Summer UP is a collaborative effort between MWCC’s Division of Access and Transition, the Mayors’ offices of the cities of Fitchburg, Leominster and Gardner, as well as various community based agencies. While providing safe recreational spaces for five weeks each summer, the program was designed to lower risky behavior and increase employment opportunities for area students. The objectives are to increase leadership, citizenship and college readiness skills for students and to ensure a safe, healthy, summer experience for at-risk children. MWCC staff assists youth employees in implementing daily craft, sports, and reading activities at each park site.

 

Linda Coyne

Linda Coyne has enrolled in MWCC’s new Health Information Management program to blend her existing computer technology experience with her emerging interest in healthcare.

Mount Wachusett Community College is rolling out several new and revised academic programs to prepare students for a wide range of careers.

“We’re excited about these new opportunities for our students,” said Dr. Melissa Fama, Vice President of Academic Affairs. “The new and redesigned programs will serve needs expressed by local employers and students will be better prepared to enter the workforce or transfer, so this is a win-win for our region.”

Health Information Management, Hospitality, Cyber Security, Analytical Laboratory and Quality Systems, and Liberal Arts programs with STEM concentrations in biological science, chemical science, physics and pre-engineering are among the additional degree and certificate offerings available when the new academic year begins in September.

Existing programs that underwent changes to align with the most current industry trends include Graphics and Interactive Design (formerly Computer Graphic Design-Print/Web); Media Arts and Technology (formerly Broadcasting & Electronic Media); Energy Management; and Medical Coding.

As part of college initiatives focused on the STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Mount Wachusett has added new concentrations in these disciplines to its existing Liberal Arts and Sciences programs.

The Liberal Arts Biological Science concentration provides students with the first two years of a typical biology program so they can transfer into a bachelor’s degree program as juniors. This associate degree may also be used as a pre-professional program for aspiring physicians, veterinarians, dentists, and pharmacists.

Similarly, the Liberal Arts Chemical Sciences and Liberal Arts with Physics or Pre-Engineering provides students the first two years of a standard college courses in preparation for transfer into four-year programs as juniors and ensuing careers.

In response to new federal laws regulating how medical records and medical coding structures are maintained, MWCC has developed an associate degree program in the expanding field of Health Information Management. Individuals working in HIM play a key role in ensuring that healthcare organizations are compliant with state and federal regulations regarding capture, storage, and release of all medical data.

This field is seeing rapid expansion that will require significant new hiring of HIM-credentialed people to meet workforce needs over the next decade. In this career, individuals with an interest in the medical field and information technology skills contribute greatly to the healthcare industry without being direct care providers.

Several certificate programs have been added to the college’s short-term academic programs. The Analytical Laboratory and Quality Systems certificate program prepares students to gain entry level positions as laboratory and quality technicians for manufacturing companies and other organizations. Example positions include quality inspectors, calibration technicians, quality control analysts, document control technicians and manufacturing production technicians.

The Cyber Security certificate helps students launch a career in information technology security. In this program, students learn how to install operating systems and applications and study networking topics, as well as learn how to secure and protect these technologies against possible exploits and attacks. Students may use this certificate as preparation for the CompTIA Security+ SYO-201 exam or as a foundation for ongoing security studies.

The new Hospitality certificate program provides students with a strong foundation in the hospitality industry. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, jobs in this field are projected to increase an average of 15.5 percent through 2018.

Dental programs tour June 2014

Incoming dental hygiene freshmen Paulette Hachey, Jessica Charron and Monica Kwan check out an operatory during a tour of MWCC’s new dental programs center in Fitchburg.

MWCC’s dental programs moved to spacious, new quarters in June, giving students, faculty and patients plenty to smile about.

The dental programs are now located at 326 Nichols Road in Fitchburg, adjacent to the original site at HealthAlliance Hospital, Burbank campus. The new facility is housed within the Community Health Connections’ newly opened, $20 million Fitchburg Family Community Health Center and continues a long-standing partnership with CHC that enables students to work with dentists and patients.

“It’s new and a pleasant, professional and inviting environment that welcomes students and patients alike,” said dental programs Director Anne Malkasian. “It’s a nice, welcoming facility to deliver good quality care in.”

The new space accommodates the growing dental programs, Malkasian said. In addition to containing the program’s seven operatories used for patient care, the new facility provides a larger classroom, designated space for space a dental materials lab, a library, offices and storage.

Students enrolled in the college’s part-time, evening dental assisting program will begin using the new facility this summer. Second-year dental hygiene students and freshmen entering the full-time, dental hygiene program in September had the opportunity to tour the new site on June 18 during their program orientation.

“The building is beautiful and we’ve all been very excited to start our second year here,” said continuing student Tasey Lemieux of Gardner.

Paulette Hachey of Fitchburg, who began her academic studies at MWCC as an English as a Second Language student, is excited to begin her dental hygiene program in the new facility this fall.

“It’s beautiful in here. It looks more like a dentist’s office than a school.

Malkasian, who plans to retire in the fall, said the move to the new location was a rewarding chapter in her career. She praised the CHC and its new chief executive officer, John DeMalia, for bringing the project to fruition and enhancing medical care for area residents.

“This is the medical and dental home for thousands of patients and it’s nice to have a beautiful facility for them,” she said.

During the past academic year, students in MWCC’s dental programs conducted fundraisers to contribute to the Community Health Connections Homestretch campaign to provide for additional clinical space and other building improvements. For more information about the campaign, visit www.thehomestretchcampaign.org.

2014 Gateway and Pathways graduates

2014 Gateway and Pathways graduates

From the age-old wisdom of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe to the reflections of teenagers wise beyond years, the May 27 graduation ceremony honoring 48 dual enrollment students at Mount Wachusett Community College offered a blend of insight and inspiration.

Students enrolled in the Gateway to College program and the Pathways Early College Innovation School, offered in partnership with the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School District, were lauded for their accomplishments by educators, family members and friends gathered in the college’s Raymond M. LaFontaine Fine Arts Center theatre. As dual enrollment students, the graduates all completed the requirements for their high school diploma while simultaneously earning college credits or an associate degree.

“As I reflect on your accomplishments, one thing comes to mind and that is that you are going to be successful, for a variety of reasons, but one in particular. You have taken a different path to graduation. You decided to be nontraditional, you decided to think outside the box and be creative. All of these skills are going to be beneficial to you,” MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino told the graduates.

“Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it,” he said, quoting van Goethe. Determining one’s calling, the president continued, can be difficult in the face of many changes, compromises, demands of time and the constant interruptions of living in a fast-paced world. “So dream,” he said. “Set aside some time for deep reflection and insight.”

Mahar Superintendent of Schools Tari N. Thomas praised the graduates for their strength and tenacity, otherwise known as grit.

“Grit is defined as sticking with things over the long term until you master them,” she said. “Research shows when it comes to achievement, grit is determined to be as essential as intellect. Research is now showing our grittiest students, the ones who are working hard with the greatest amount of determination, are the ones realizing the greatest success and even the greatest GPAs. All of you are unique and strong. You’ve demonstrated the grit necessary for high achievement, scholarly success and more. You’re hard working, tenacious and diligent and it will pay off.”

Gateway valedictorian Zoe Greim shared her personal story of adversity and triumph. Diagnosed in high school with Multiple Sclerosis, she viewed the news as a “wake-up call” to take charge of her life and not waste a minute of time. Disenchanted with the high schools she attended, she enrolled in the Gateway to College program at the advice of a guidance counselor and was named to the dean’s list or president’s list during all three semesters at the college. This fall, she will transfer to a university in Florida to pursue a bachelor’s degree.

“We need to see life is too short to sit around and wait for good or bad things to come to us. We need to go out and make things happen. I know we can all do that, since we all made the decision to come here. We need to strive to be the best we can be. If you want something, go get it and don’t let anyone or anything stand in your way,” Greim told her fellow graduates.

Pathways valedictorian Erin Leamy reflected on the diverse paths each student took to reach their graduation day, as well as the common traits they all share.

“We all had something in common that inspired us to leave high school early and get a jump start on college. For some, it was simply time to move on. We no longer felt academically challenged. For others, high school had become stale, and we were looking for a fresh start. I can’t help but wonder how many diverse paths each of our lives will take – how many ways we’ll be challenged, and how each of us will respond to those challenges.”

Joseph Benavidez , who graduated in 2009 from the Gateway program and earned an associate degree in Liberal Arts from MWCC in 2010, was the keynote speaker. After graduating from MWCC, he transferred to Salem State University and earned a bachelor’s degree in communications in 2013 and is now working as a journalist.

“Tonight, you are all warriors after a battle. You’ve earned your high school diploma. Some of you have already received college degrees as well. It took sweat and hardship to get here and that deserves a round of applause.”

Deborah Bibeau, assistant dean of transitions programming at MWCC, praised the partnership between the college and the school district. “As a testament to the long-term collaboration with the Ralph C. Mahar Regional School District, this summer we’ll be preparing for the new Pathways students entering the program’s fifth year of operation, and new Gateway students entering the program’s ninth year of operation.”

Mount Wachusett Community College graduates

Graduates Lindsey Arnold and Kathleen Craigen.

In a Commencement address peppered with accolades and advice, University of Massachusetts, Lowell Chancellor Marty Meehan praised the graduating Class of 2014 for their achievements and offered words of wisdom as they begin a new chapter in their lives.

Mount Wachusett graduates receive “a better education” than most college and university graduates, Meehan said, because in addition to mastering their academic subjects and overcoming challenges, they learned how to be great human beings through the college-wide emphasis on civic engagement.

“You have unprecedented means to engage with your communities, and indeed the world,” he said during the college’s 49th Commencement on May 21. This year, MWCC awarded 857 associate degrees and certificates to 786 graduates.

A first-generation college student, Meehan earned his bachelor’s degree at UMass Lowell while working full-time as a janitor, then went on to graduate school and served seven terms in Congress before becoming chancellor of his alma mater.

“Some of you are the first ones in your families to get a college degree. Some of you are new immigrants that have come to the United States. Some of you got married earlier and raised families and have come back to college to earn your degree. But all of your collective experiences have made you stronger, and I want you to know there is nothing you can’t accomplish if you set your mind to it.”

Meehan concluded his address with key tips for the graduates, urging them to be great listeners; commit themselves to lifelong learning to keep pace with a rapidly changing world; to never compromise their integrity; to follow their passion; and be humble and always remember their roots.

President Daniel M. Asquino commended the graduates for their ongoing commitment to improving the world around them through education and service, noting this past academic year, MWCC students collectively devoted more than 144,000 hours of service learning and volunteerism to their communities.

“My wish for you is that you use your education to continue these pursuits and to improve your life, that of you family and friends, and that of your community, state and your nation and that you manifest an overall behavior that enlarges your circle of good,” he said.

Chevenee Reavis and President Daniel Asquino

Alumna of the Year Chevenee Reavis and President Asquino on Commencement day.

Alumna of the Year Chevenee Reavis reflected on her memories while a student at the college and shared experiences about her career path since graduating in 2000 with an associate degree in Business Administration.

“What I remember most about being here at the Mount was learning about myself and what I had in terms of character and in terms of conviction.”

Reavis, who began her studies as a dual enrollment student and transferred to Emerson College for a bachelor’s degree in marketing and communications, now serves as director of strategic initiatives for the global organization Water.org, raising awareness about the water crisis affecting 2.5 billion people worldwide.

The nonprofit, co-founded by CEO Gary White and actor Matt Damon, has transformed thousands of communities in Africa, South Asia and Central America by providing access to safe water and sanitation to more than one million people.

“We have an enormous mission and vision and that is to see the day when everyone in the world has access to safe drinking water and the dignity of a toilet,” she said to a round of applause. “It does sound so basic, and yet I think many of you here know it is unfortunately not the reality for everyone around the world. We’re not waiting for a cure. We’re not waiting for a scientific breakthrough. We know the cure – it’s engineering. We’ve known how to deliver safe water and adequate sanitation for hundreds of years.”

At MWCC, Reavis said, she learned what this year’s graduates are also learning – that they can create their own path in life.

“Whatever step this is for you, whether you’re going to another school, or this is a stepping stone in a job, or a personal goal, be really proud of yourselves.”

Jillian Johnson was presented with the Trustees Award for her service this year on the MWCC Board of Trustees. The President’s Key Award for academic excellence was presented to Natural Resources major Seth Pease and Business Administration major Nina Margand. Kathleen Matson and Bryan Sanderson were presented with the Dean’s Key, which is awarded for outstanding community service. Emerita status was presented to Biology Professor Christine Kisiel.

The 2014 Service above Self Award was presented to Attorney Charles A. Gelinas, Sr., for his ongoing leadership on many North Central Massachusetts initiatives.

For more photos, click here to visit MWCC’s Facebook page.

Nursing Class of 2014

MWCC’s Associate Degree Nursing Class of 2014.

The academic achievements of MWCC’s 41st associate degree nursing graduating class were celebrated during a traditional pinning ceremony held May 22 in the Fitness and Wellness Center.

The graduating class was comprised of students enrolled in the day and evening programs and included LPN’s who returned to continue their education through the college’s new Bridge to Nursing program.

MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino congratulated the students on their success completing one of the college’s most rigorous academic programs. He noted that the care and compassion of nurses bring tremendous comfort to patients who are often at their lowest moment and in pain. “You truly can make a difference in their healing and their lives.”

Eileen Costello, dean of the School of Health Sciences and Community Service Programs, also welcomed the graduates and their families. Cindy Andrews, Director of Nursing and Assistant Vice President of Seven Hills Pediatric Center, delivered the keynote address. As part of their clinical experience, the students receive training at Seven Hills, and many are hired by the long-term care center for children with severe disabilities. Three employees of the center were among the graduates.

“Mount Wachusett nurses have just been a godsend to us,” she said. “They are so well trained.” Andrews encouraged the graduates to continue on with their education and always advocate for their patients. “They’re relying on you to be their voice.”

Dressed in traditional nurse uniforms, the students were welcomed into the profession by having the program’s nursing pin fastened to their lapels by a family member, friend, or an alumnus of the program, or a faculty member, to the cheers of family and friends. The pin symbolizes where the nurses completed their studies to become an RN and distinguishes them from other health care professionals. The eight-star MWCC pin is imprinted with the words “Service to Humanity and the World.”

As part of the ceremony, the students also took a nursing pledge that dates back to Florence Nightingale, who distinguished herself during the Crimean War by coming to the aid of sick and woundedsoldiers.