advanced manufacturing

Bionostics Floyd 2A consortium of four Massachusetts community colleges and partnering vocational-technical high schools, local workforce investment boards, the Northeast Advanced Manufacturing Consortium and employers has received a $4 million federal TechHire grant to provide workforce training in advanced manufacturing in Worcester, Middlesex and Essex counties.

The Massachusetts Advanced Manufacturing TechHire Consortium (MassAMTC) is a strategic partnership of training providers, employers and the workforce investment system. With this four-year grant from the U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration, MassAMTC will provide training, work-based experiences, support services and job placement assistance in advanced manufacturing to 300 young people and 100 other unemployed, underemployed, or dislocated workers.

Led by Mount Wachusett Community College in collaboration with Middlesex Community College, Northern Essex Community College, and North Shore Community College, MassAMTC has the support of major regional industry association partners, including the Northeast Advanced Manufacturing Consortium, which represents 13 different advanced manufacturing employers.

Additional partners include the North Central Workforce Investment Board (WIB), Greater Lowell WIB, Metro North Regional Employment Board, North Shore WIB and Merrimack Valley WIB, Lowell Technical High School, Lynn Vocational Technical High School, Essex Technical High School, Whittier Regional Technical High School and Greater Lawrence Technical High School.

“I congratulate Mount Wachusett, Middlesex, North Shore and Northern Essex community colleges on receiving a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to accelerate their advanced manufacturing training partnership program,” said Congresswoman Niki Tsongas. “Boosting American manufacturing and increasing educational opportunities are two essential components to our nation’s future, and this funding will allow Massachusetts to continue to lead in both areas by providing top-tier training and credential programs that also bolster our local manufacturing companies and workforce.”

“We are excited to begin this new partnership,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “Best practices and curriculum from each institution will be shared and implemented, thereby benefiting employers and employees of the entire North Central and Northeast region.”

More than $150 million in the H-1B TechHire grant program were awarded in July to 39 partnerships, providing training in 25 states across the country. More than 18,000 participants will receive services, with a focus on youth and young adults ages 17 to 29 with barriers to employment, as well as veterans and individuals with disabilities, limited English proficiency, criminal records, and long-term unemployment.

President Asquino & Deval Patrick Boston Foundation

Former Governor Deval Patrick presents the Boston Foundation’s Deval Patrick Award to President Asquino.

Former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick announced at a Boston Foundation forum Tuesday afternoon that Mount Wachusett Community College is the recipient of the 2016 innovation prize named for him.

The Boston Foundation created the Deval Patrick Award for Community Colleges in 2014 to recognize progress and excellence in establishing partnerships between employers and community colleges, in the process building effective career pathways for students from one of Massachusetts’ 15 Community Colleges.

The annual $50,000 award is given to a community college selected by a volunteer committee of representatives from the higher education, workforce and business communities.

“I’m particularly happy to award this year’s prize to Mount Wachusett Community College,” Gov. Patrick said, lauding the college’s manufacturing job training programs. “When I proposed changes to the way we think of community colleges, this is the type of outcome I had in mind.”

“During his time as Governor of Massachusetts and since his return to private life, Deval Patrick has always demonstrated a commitment to advancing and improving educational and career opportunities for all residents of the Commonwealth, but especially to those most in need,” said Paul S. Grogan, President and CEO of the Boston Foundation.

“In hosting and presenting the Deval Patrick Award, the Boston Foundation seeks to honor Governor Patrick’s passion and reiterate our own support for collaboration between the academic and business communities. Mt. Wachusett Community College’s unique job training programs demonstrate the high level of timely innovation called for by the Patrick Award.”

MWCC, which serves 4,700 credit students at its main campus in Gardner and satellite campuses in Devens, Leominster and Fitchburg, was selected for developing its Advanced Manufacturing Technology Programs – stackable programs in advanced manufacturing that address local employer training needs and provide for multiple entry and exit points. Interested students can take non-credit or credit classes that lead directly to employment opportunities, industry credentials, and a pathway for completing additional credit courses at the college. Over the past two years, 291 students have enrolled in the program.

“We are honored that the Boston Foundation has recognized the value of the opportunities we are offering our students,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “We are very fortunate to be working with industry partners to ensure we are providing employers with a trained and skilled workforce so that we can support and grow our regional economy.”

The Advanced Manufacturing Technology Programs offer four levels of training:

  • The six-week Industrial Readiness Training (IRT) that provides skills for entry-level employees in manufacturing and addresses workplace success (soft) skills, technical content, and numeracy/literacy.
  • The optional 40-hour Quality Systems Training (QST), which is offered as stand alone or in conjunction with the IRT, prepares students for American Society for Quality certification, and provides three credits for a college course. The QST employment placement rate exceeds 77%.
  • The one-year certificate in Mechatronics (Automation and Robotics) and a one-year certificate in Analytical Laboratory and Quality Systems.
  • And finally, the optional 2-year A.S. Degree in Manufacturing Technology – Plastics or a 2-year A.S. Degree in Biomanufacturing with a Quality concentration.

Several other speakers addressed the audience at the Patrick Award forum Tuesday, including Grogan; Massachusetts Secretary of Labor Ronald L. Walker; Joseph Fuller, Harvard Business School professor of Management Practice; Lane Glenn, President of North Essex Community College and president of the Massachusetts Community Colleges Executive Office Council of Presidents; Bob LePage and Jeff Hayden from the Springfield Technical Community College/Holyoke Community College partnership; and Elizabeth Pauley, Boston Foundation Senior Director of Education to Career. Walker gave a talk titled, “The Economic Imperative,” followed by Fuller’s presentation, “Addressing the Job Skills Mismatch.” Fuller and Walker then discussed job creation together.

Over the past half-century, Mount Wachusett Community College has built a tradition of providing innovative undergraduate education, workforce development, personal enrichment, and community service to North Central Massachusetts, and beyond. Rooted in the community since 1963, the college now serves approximately 12,000 credit and noncredit students each year at its main campus in Gardner and satellite campuses in Devens, Leominster and Fitchburg. An award-winning, national leader in the area of renewable energy and sustainability, MWCC is also nationally recognized for its veterans’ services, civic engagement and K-12 partnerships. The college is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).

The Boston Foundation, Greater Boston’s community foundation, is one of the largest community foundations in the nation, with net assets of some $1 billion. In 2015, the Foundation and its donors made more than $110 million in grants to nonprofit organizations and received gifts of approximately $120 million. In celebration of its centennial in 2015, the Boston Foundation launched the Campaign for Boston to strengthen the Permanent Fund for Boston, Greater Boston’s only endowment fund supporting organizations focused on the most pressing needs of Greater Boston.  The Foundation is proud to be a partner in philanthropy, with nearly 1,000 separate charitable funds established by donors either for the general benefit of the community or for special purposes.

The Boston Foundation also serves as a major civic leader, provider of information, convener and sponsor of special initiatives that address the region’s most serious challenges. The Philanthropic Initiative (TPI), an operating unit of the Foundation, designs and implements customized philanthropic strategies for families, foundations and corporations around the globe. For more information about the Boston Foundation and TPI, visit www.tbf.org or call 617-338-1700.

Manufacturing Roundtable at MWCC Jan 5 2016

Senior Learning Specialist Jennifer Stephens demonstrates new advanced manufacturing equipment to lawmakers, business and community leaders during a tour of the Devens campus and meeting of the North Central Massachusetts Manufacturing Roundtable.

State lawmakers joined community and business leaders to underscore the value manufacturing brings to the region and brainstorm ways to employ more workers in this prosperous and growing field during the monthly meeting of the North Central Massachusetts Manufacturing Roundtable.

The January 5 meeting was hosted by Mount Wachusett Community College at its Devens campus, and included tours of the college’s Manufacturing Workforce Center and equipment demonstrations.

Nearly 40 people joined MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino for the dialogue, including state Senators Jennifer Flanagan, Anne Gobi and Jamie Eldridge; state Representative Jennifer Benson; Thatcher Kezer, MassDevelopment senior vice president, Devens; Gardner Mayor Mark Hawke; Fitchburg Mayor Stephen DiNatale; North Central Massachusetts Chamber President and CEO Roy Nascimento; Nashoba Valley Chamber President and CEO Melissa Fetterhoff; Greater Gardner Chamber President and CEO Jim Bellina; and representatives from the North Central Career Center, Workforce Investment Board and offices of Congressman Jim McGovern, Congresswoman Niki Tsongas, and state Representative Harold Naughton.

Much of the discussion focused on changing public perception about manufacturing by raising awareness about today’s clean, modern and safe facilities, diverse, well-paying jobs, employee benefits and opportunities for career growth in the industry. Attendees vowed to remain committed to fighting the stigma associated with manufacturing by enhancing collaboration with area school systems to provide career information to students, parents and educators.

“There is a greater awareness, but it hasn’t risen to the parents’ level” of recommending manufacturing as a viable, stable career field for their children, said David McKeehan, former president of the North Central Massachusetts Chamber who founded the Manufacturing Roundtable 15 years ago as a way for business and industry leaders to address mutual concerns and grow the region’s economy.

Manufacturing accounts for nearly 25 percent of the workforce in North Central Massachusetts, yet finding workers remains a critical issue, particularly among young people who are needed to fill positions being vacated by retiring baby boomers.

“Manufacturing is what built us. This is the backbone of our community,” said Senator Flanagan.

MWCC opened its Manufacturing Workforce Center in fall 2013 in response to the increasing demand for production workers. In addition to the Industry Readiness Training Program, the college offers a variety of credit and noncredit STEM programs including analytical laboratory & quality systems training, mechatronics and associate degrees in biotechnology and manufacturing technology.

This year, MWCC will continue offering free training in advanced manufacturing through its Industry Readiness Training Program. The next, six-week course begins on January 19 at the Devens campus.

The training program is made possible through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration. For more information about registering, visit mwcc.edu/advancedmanufacturing or contact the campus at 978-630-9883 or creifsteck@mwcc.mass.edu.

 

 

Bionostics Floyd 2Mount Wachusett Community College is recruiting adults of all ages, experience and education for training in the growing field of advanced manufacturing. Full scholarships are available for eligible students who enroll in an upcoming six-week day program, which begins on January 19 at MWCC’s Devens campus.

Manufacturing accounts for nearly 25 percent of the workforce in North Central Massachusetts, employing more than 14,000 people in the region. The demand for skilled workers continues to grow as a result of new opportunities and the retirement of older workers.

The Industry Readiness Training (IRT) Program is a short-term intensive non-credit training program developed with industry employers to prepare students for entry to mid-level jobs in the local, diverse advanced manufacturing industry. The program is designed especially for unemployed or underemployed adults, veterans and recent high school graduates. The program provides students with training in skills required for entry-level employment as technicians in manufacturing, validation, quality control, documentation, process operations and more.

Students who successfully complete the program will earn an MWCC Certificate of Completion, an OSHA 10-hour Safety Certification and the National Career Readiness Certificate, while learning about working in the fast-growing manufacturing field.

The six-week program will take place Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The course includes hands-on, lecture-based material as well as self-paced KeyTrain curriculum leading to the National Career Readiness Certification.

Students must possess a minimum of a high school diploma or equivalent. Students will have access to staff members who will assist them with the registration process, facilitate access to support services, and help them with their search for employment when they have completed the certificate program successfully. Tutoring and job search support is also available.

The training program is made possible through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration. Tuition support is provided by a Workforce Competitiveness Trust Fund grant awarded through the North Central Massachusetts Workforce Investment Board by Commonwealth Corporation on behalf of the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development.

For more information about enrolling in the training program, visit mwcc.edu/advancedmanufacturing, contact the Devens campus at 978-630-9883, or email Career Development Coach Christian Reifsteck at creifsteck@mwcc.mass.edu.

 

By Sam Bonacci

In the last two years, successful workforce development programs at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Mount Wachusett Community College have been built around one thing: real-world conditions and equipment that create skills that can be directly applied to the workplace.

WPI’s Biomanufacturing Education & Training Center (BETC) got its start with a fundamentals program in 2007 that has prepared 800 people for biomanufacturing work. The program allowed people looking to launch careers in that hot field to take a class in the basics of the industry. That program is still in place, but represents only a small portion of the training held there today. Since the completion of lab space at the Prescott Street facility in 2013, a new emphasis has been placed on continuing education for those already in the field.

”This (facility) takes into account all aspects of biomanufacturing … it is all covered under one roof,” said Kamal Rashid, director of the BETC, who explained that the equipment creates an “industrial experience,” reflecting exactly what’s being used at manufacturers around the country.

In a field with tight federal controls, continuous training is not an option but a necessity, Rashid said. The center offers training that companies can’t do with their own equipment — due to such issues as contamination concerns — or that need to be taught to larger groups. These group trainings not only accelerate individual advancement, but create more talent and expertise for a company, helping a company be more productive, Rashid says. Cross-training employees so they’re familiar with multiple aspects of the process can help accelerate a company’s growth.

”Getting from the door to the floor can be faster if they go through a training at our facility, but it is also for people who have been in the industry … (companies) want them to get acquainted with the recent developments,” Rashid said. “Training is not an end result … training is an ongoing thing.”

The proof of the concept for WPI lies in its corporate partners who send their people to learn. The program has a nearly two-year partnership with Biogen, and more than 26 companies, from as far away as Illinois, have sent their employees to Worcester for training, Rashid said.

Meanwhile, Mount Wachusett Community College (MWCC) offers programs to help the advanced manufacturing industry, whose businesses have reported having a hard time finding qualified employees. MWCC recently shared a $15.9 million U.S. Department of Labor grant with four other colleges, and has been undertaking the Advanced Manufacturing Industry Readiness Training program, shared with three other institutions.

“We are providing the skilled workforce and changing the perception so that people who might not think of it as a career can understand the benefits,” said Jacqueline Belrose, MWCC’s vice president of lifelong learning and workforce development, who oversees the grant.

While the WPI program ranges from a day to a week for the continuing education classes, MWCC’s runs six weeks. The college’s programs are designed to prepare people for manufacturing careers, allowing people to get training, then return for more training to help them advance. Key to this program is an understanding of the equipment, which is why it’s important to be using the same equipment the students will use after graduation, Belrose said.

The program has been growing as word spreads, Belrose said, with 106 graduates since 2013. It also helps that it’s free because of the grant. The program has also proved popular with employers. At the recent graduation ceremony, recruiters from local companies were on site doing interviews.

Eric Longo, the vice president of manufacturing at Bemis Associates, an international firm with operations in Shirley, sits on the advisory board for the MWCC’s program, which allows Bemis to help develop the curriculum.

“We have an aging workforce in New England as it relates to manufacturing skills and we have to re-invigorate the next generations of employees to be aware of the opportunities in manufacturing but also have the skill set to meet the needs of the employers,” he said.

Injectronics of Clinton has partnered with MWCC to find new employees. Human resources manager Karen Hartwell said there has been increasing competition for qualified employees, particularly in medical device manufacturing. “For the first time in years, turnover is increasing at the production level due to recruitment from other companies,” she said. “This has typically occurred in technical or engineering levels, but now has impacted the production levels as well increasing the challenge to attract and retain experienced staff.”

Like MWCC, WPI sees widening demand for its offerings.

”There are about 1,600 biotech companies in the United States and we want all of them to know about us,” Rashid said. “Our aim is first to respond to the needs of Massachusetts, then nationwide, and our president looks to the globalization of WPI, so we will go global.”

advanced manufacturing grads April 2015

MWCC Career Development Coaches Christian Reifsteck and Meghan Koslowski, front row, at right, with the newest graduates of MWCC’s ongoing Advanced Manufacturing Career Preparation program, from left: Chad McCarthy, Paul Kanga, James Nason, Shane Murray, Bill Cohan, Marciel Vargas and Jim Concannon.

Recent graduates of Mount Wachusett Community College’s Advanced Manufacturing Career Preparation program met special guests at their recognition ceremony – their potential employers.

Recruiters and human resource professionals from Nypro, Bemis Associates, Injectronics, RockTenn and Boutwell Owens were at the college’s Devens campus on April 9 to congratulate the new graduates and speak with them about job opportunities at their companies.

Julie Crowley, regional manager for the national grant funding the project, said the matchmaking is one service of the six-week program, currently free to qualifying students through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration.

“We know this isn’t about just getting a job. This is going to be a career path,” Crowley said.

The training program is designed especially for unemployed or underemployed adults, veterans and recent high school graduates who want to train for careers the manufacturing industry. Programs provide students with training in skills required for entry-level employment in positions such as technicians in manufacturing, validation, quality control, documentation, and process operations. Students who successfully complete the program will earn an MWCC Certificate of Completion, an OSHA 10-hour Safety Certification and the National Career Readiness Certificate, while learning about working in the fast-growing manufacturing field.

Following stints in restaurants and lumberyards, plumbing and some manufacturing, 22-year-old Shane Murray of Fitchburg enrolled in the program to gain training and certification to build a career, he said. “I just needed a change and this was the perfect thing I needed. I’m glad I made this decision.”

Marciel Vargas, 38 worked in textile manufacturing in the Dominican Republic and holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from her native country. After moving to the U.S. a decade ago, she honed her English skills, raised her family and worked part-time as a tax preparer. When her children entered school, the Fitchburg resident decided it was time to re-enter the workforce.  In addition to gaining employment, her goal is to become licensed in industrial engineering in Massachusetts within two years. She said she considers the MWCC training program an important rung in the ladder to get there.

“I enjoy the challenge of the work. I like to make things and there’s a variety of things you can do in manufacturing,” she said. “Even though you may be working on one specific product, there are a lot of things going on in the process.”

In addition to Murray and Vargas, other recent graduates are Chad McCarthy of Westminster, James Nason of Phillipston, Paul Kanga of Worcester, Jim Concannon of Fitchburg and Bill Cohan of Westford.

Lauren Beckner, human resources coordinator for Injectronics, said the medical device manufacturing company recently tapped into the training program for two components – blueprint reading and quality boot camp – to help an incumbent worker gain skills in order to be promoted.

Through the TAACCCT grant, the programs will continue to be offered for free for the next 18 months to prepare students to directly enter the workplace. The sessions include training in basic machines and robotics, measurement techniques, electronics, Lean,Six Sigma, Work Keys, quality/clean room processes, blueprint reading and success skills. Students can further their education in the manufacturing field through MWCC’s new academic certificate and associate degree programs in Analytical Laboratory & Quality Systems, and earn transferrable credits toward a bachelor’s degree.

An upcoming, two-week Quality Boot Camp training will begin on April 27. The upcoming six-week, 180-hour Advanced Manufacturing Career Preparation program will begin on May 11. This program is open to students who do not already have a college degree. The course includes hands-on work with robotics and other equipment, as well as self-paced KeyTrain curriculum leading to the National Career Readiness Certification. Additional six-week sessions will take place throughout the year.

For more information about enrolling in the training program, contact Career Development Coaches Christian Reifsteck or Meghan Koslowski at 978-630-9883 or email creifsteck@mwcc.mass.edu.

Bionostics Floyd 2Mount Wachusett Community College is recruiting adults of all ages, experience and education for training in the growing field of advanced manufacturing. Full scholarships are available for eligible students who enroll in an upcoming six-week day program, which begins on Feb. 9 at MWCC’s Devens campus.

Manufacturing accounts for nearly 25 percent of the workforce in North Central Massachusetts, employing more than 14,000 people in the region. The demand for skilled workers continues to grow as a result of new opportunities and the retirement of older workers.

The training program is designed especially for unemployed or underemployed adults, veterans and recent high school graduates who want to train for careers the manufacturing industry. Programs provide students with training in skills required for entry-level employment as technicians in manufacturing, validation, quality control, documentation, process operations and more.

Students who successfully complete the program will earn an MWCC Certificate of Completion, an OSHA 10-hour Safety Certification and the National Career Readiness Certificate, while learning about working in the fast-growing manufacturing field.

The six-week, 180-hour Advanced Manufacturing Career Preparation program will take place Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. This program is open to students who do not already have a college degree. The course includes hands-on, lecture-based material as well as self-paced KeyTrain curriculum leading to the National Career Readiness Certification.

Students must possess a minimum of a high school diploma or equivalent. Students will have access to staff members who will assist them with the registration process, facilitate access to support services, and help them with their search for employment when they have completed the certificate program successfully. Tutoring and job search support is also available.

The training program is made possible through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration. Tuition support is provided by a Workforce Competitiveness Trust Fund grant awarded through the North Central Massachusetts Workforce Investment Board by Commonwealth Corporation on behalf of the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development.

For more information about enrolling in the training program, contact the Devens campus at 978-630-9569 or email Career Development Coach Christian Reifsteck at creifsteck@mwcc.mass.edu.

Congresswoman Niki Tsongas speaks with Mount Wachusett Community College biotechnology students Dana Procell and Savannah Cooke during a tour of the college’s Devens campus Monday. The Congresswoman joined state and college officials to celebrate the start of Manufacturing Week.

Congresswoman Niki Tsongas speaks with Mount Wachusett Community College biotechnology students Dana Procell and Savannah Cooke during a tour of the college’s Devens campus Monday. The Congresswoman joined state and college officials to celebrate the start of Manufacturing Week.

Congresswoman Niki Tsongas, Housing and Economic Development Secretary Greg Bialecki, Labor and Workforce Development Secretary Rachel Kaprielian, and dozens of regional business and community leaders gathered at Mount Wachusett Community College’s Devens campus on Monday, Sept. 29 to celebrate the start of Manufacturing Week.

The event marked the success to date of a $15.9 million multi-year Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant MWCC and three partnering schools in Ohio, Louisiana and Tennessee received last fall to develop and expand advanced manufacturing programs in partnership with industry.

Governor Deval Patrick proclaimed Sept. 29 through Oct. 3 as Advanced Manufacturing Week in Massachusetts, underscoring the administration’s support of the robust advanced manufacturing industry and its workforce throughout the Commonwealth. The week-long celebration coincides with national efforts to promote the role advanced manufacturing plays in the economy, with the third annual National Advanced Manufacturing Day being celebrated on October 3.

“It is both gratifying and timely to see North County manufacturing experiencing a renaissance,” said MWCC President Daniel M. Asquino. “We are grateful for the Congressional assistance we received to be the lead institution with three other colleges to develop curriculum in conjunction with employers’ needs. We have seen 70-percent placement among our 82 graduates and are amazed at the opportunities in North Central Massachusetts for mid-level employees.”

As she visits companies throughout her district, Congresswoman Tsongas said she is “constantly struck by the level of innovation” she sees among industry and public partnerships. Mount Wachusett “is committed to educating the workforce, the young people and the not so young, is committed to being a partner with local businesses, and is mindful of the true manufacturing skillset needed,” she said.

“Manufacturing is thriving and growing in all parts of the state, not just in Boston,” Secretary Bialecki said. “Schools like Mount Wachusett are listening to businesses and understanding what it means to train people for 21st century advanced manufacturing careers.”

Secretary Kaprielian quipped that “every day should be manufacturing day” because of the industry’s enduring significance to the state’s economic development. “This is not your grandfather’s manufacturing, and it is not dirty, polluting or imported. It is knowledge-based with a career ladder,” she said. “Nowhere are you training people better than at the community college level. Mount Wachusett is an example for the rest of the state.”

President Asquino welcomes students and job seekers to the college’s Manufacturing Day expo, held Oct. 3 at the Devens campus.

President Asquino welcomes students and job seekers to the college’s Manufacturing Day expo, held Oct. 3 at the Devens campus.

The manufacturing week kick-off event included a tour of the college’s Advanced Manufacturing Training Center and biotechnology labs. Speakers also included State Senator Jamie Eldridge, State Rep. Stephen DiNatale and Gardner Mayor Mark Hawke.

The event also coincided with Monday’s White House announcement that the Massachusetts Community Colleges Consortia will receive an additional $20 million grant under the final round of TAACCCT funding. The 15-member group, led by Massasoit Community College, received the grant to continue advancing state-wide initiatives addressing the training and educational needs in the STEM fields – Science, Technology, Engineering and Math – as well as advanced manufacturing and healthcare. The Consortium was awarded the highest-funded of 66 U.S. DOL grants.

At MWCC, the new round of funding will be used to create and enhance certificate programs in career readiness, hospitality, cyber security, information technology and other areas.

In recognition of National Manufacturing Day on Oct. 3, MWCC’s Devens campus hosted an Advanced Manufacturing Career Expo. Attendees toured the manufacturing and skills-training labs and participated in hands-on exercises and individual information sessions.

Mount Wachusett Community College is hosting an Advanced Manufacturing Career Expo on Friday, Oct. 3 in recognition of National Manufacturing Day.

The career expo will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in MWCC’s Manufacturing Workforce Certification Center, located at the college’s Devens campus, 27 Jackson Road. Registration begins at 11 a.m., followed by opening remarks at 11:30 and ongoing tours, demonstrations and table displays beginning at 11:45.

Serving as a networking and informational event, the expo will bring together industry representatives and job seekers. Participating companies will accept résumés and highlight career options and training programs. Attendees can tour the manufacturing and skills-training labs and participate in hands-on exercises and individual information sessions.

MWCC opened the Manufacturing Workforce Certification Center in fall 2013 in response to the increasing demand for production workers. Manufacturing accounts for nearly 25 percent of the workforce in North Central Massachusetts, employing more than 14,000 people in the region. The college offers a variety of credit and noncredit STEM programs at its Devens campus, including the Advanced Manufacturing Industrial Readiness Training program, the Analytical Laboratory & Quality Systems Certificate program and associate degree and academic certificate programs in biotechnology/biomanufacturing.

The career expo is free, although reservations are required. To reserve a seat, call978-630-9569 or email Julie Crowley, TAACCCT III Regional Project Manager, atjcrowley@mwcc.mass.edu.